Medicaid waiver tracker approved and pending section 1115 waivers by state the henry j. kaiser family foundation npower electricity supplier number

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1. Populations, exemptions, penalties or consequences, and other details vary significantly by waiver. ME: On December 21, 2018, CMS approved a Section 1115 waiver for Maine that included a work requirement and other eligibility restrictions. On January 22, 2019, the new Governor Janet Mills informed CMS that the state is not accepting the terms of the approved waiver.

5. On November 20, 2018, CMS reapproved the Kentucky HEALTH waiver, including all of the provisions set aside in a previous decision issued by the gas mask bong how to use DC federal district court in Stewart v. Azar, with minor technical changes. On June 29, 2018, the court set aside the Kentucky HEALTH waiver approval and sent the waiver back to HHS to reconsider the following provisions: the work requirement, monthly premiums up to 4% of income, coverage lockouts for failure to timely renew eligibility or timely report a change in circumstances, heightened cost-sharing for non-emergency ER use, and elimination of retroactive eligibility and non-emergency medical transportation. The separate “institution for mental disease” substance use disorder payment waiver was not set aside and was allowed to go into effect.

6. For non-exempt parents or caretakers whose incomes exceed the eligibility threshold as a result of meeting the work requirement, but who continue to fulfill the requirement, Mississippi would extend Medicaid coverage for a 12-month transitional medical assistance period. These beneficiaries would then qualify for an additional 12 months of coverage contingent upon continued work/community engagement participation.

8. For non-exempt parents or caretakers whose incomes exceed the eligibility threshold as a result of meeting the work requirement, but who continue to fulfill the requirement, South Dakota would extend Medicaid coverage for a 12-month transitional medical benefits (TMB) period. These beneficiaries would then qualify for an additional 12 months of premium assistance (limited to no more than the previous year’s TMB per member per month amount) to pay e gasoline for employer-sponsored insurance or qualified health plan premiums. Beneficiaries would be responsible for cost sharing and any premium costs exceeding the TMB amount during the premium assistance period.

9. If approved by CMS, Utah’s Medicaid expansion will consist of an enhanced federal match for childless adults up to 100% FPL and adults with dependents between 60-100% FPL. Individuals subject to the work requirement provision would be required to complete participation requirements within three months of the demonstration’s approval in order to maintain eligibility for the remainder of their 12-month eligibility period. They must continue to meet such requirements every 12 months to continue to receive Medicaid benefits.

1. ME: On December 21, 2018, CMS approved a Section 1115 waiver for Maine that included a work requirement and other eligibility restrictions. On January 22, 2019, the new Governor Janet Mills informed CMS that the state is not accepting the terms of the approved waiver. KY: On November 20, 2018, CMS reapproved the Kentucky HEALTH waiver, including all of the provisions set aside in a previous decision issued by the DC federal district court in Stewart v. Azar, with minor technical changes. On June 29, 2018, the court set aside the Kentucky HEALTH waiver approval and sent the waiver back to HHS to reconsider the following provisions: the work requirement, monthly premiums up to 4% of income, coverage lockouts for failure to timely renew eligibility or timely report a change in circumstances, heightened cost-sharing for non-emergency ER use, and elimination of retroactive eligibility and non-emergency medical transportation. The separate “institution for mental disease” substance use disorder payment waiver was not set aside and was allowed to go into effect.

medically needy, etc.) but may also refer to narrow/limited populations that gained coverage through the demonstration waiver. For example electricity kwh calculator, WI’s waiver covers childless adults ages 19 to 64 with income up to 100% FPL (without enhanced ACA matching funds). UT’s waiver expanded eligibility and provided a limited benefit package to certain nonelderly adults up to 100% FPL (the “PCN group”), and recently extended coverage to a limited group of childless adults who are homeless and have behavioral health needs up to 5% FPL. The pending waiver would apply differential benefit packages to parents up to 100% FPL and for childless adults up to 100% FPL (although benefits within each group would be the same).

6. Six other states (DE, MA, MD, RI, TN, and UT) have retroactive coverage waivers that pre-date the ACA and may have been associated with achieving the budgetary savings necessary to expand coverage before federal law authorized the use of Medicaid funds for childless adults. Some of these waivers apply to limited populations, and most have exceptions for seniors and people with disabilities.

1. On November 20, 2018, CMS reapproved the Kentucky HEALTH waiver, including all of the provisions set aside in a previous decision issued by the DC federal district court in Stewart v. Azar, with minor technical changes. On June 29, 2018, the court set aside the Kentucky HEALTH waiver approval and sent the waiver back to HHS to reconsider the following provisions: the work requirement, monthly premiums up to 4% of income, coverage lockouts for failure to timely renew eligibility or timely report a change in circumstances, heightened cost-sharing for non-emergency ER use, and elimination of retroactive eligibility and non-emergency medical transportation. The separate “institution for mental disease” substance use disorder payment waiver was not set aside and was allowed to go into effect.

UT: The approved provision applies to both the PCN and limited childless adult groups, while the pending waiver would apply to 19 and 20 year olds under the demonstration. UT’s approved waiver expanded eligibility and provided a limited benefit package to certain nonelderly adults up to 100% FPL (the “PCN group”), and recently extended coverage to a limited group of childless adults who are homeless and have behavioral health needs up to 5% FPL. The pending waiver would apply differential benefit packages to parents up to 100% FPL and for childless adults up to 100% FPL (although benefits within each group would be the same gas 6 weeks pregnant).

GENERAL NOTES: “MLTSS” = Managed long-term services and supports, “BH” = Behavioral health. This table does NOT include family planning or CHIP-only waivers. Some states have multiple waivers, and many waivers are comprehensive and may fall into a few different areas. This table does NOT include/capture states mandating managed care through Section 1115 (since waiver authority is not generally required for these initiatives) and does not capture delivery system reform, behavioral health, or LTSS initiatives that do not require Section 1115 expenditure authority/federal funds. For additional details on what is included in each category, see category-specific notes and definitions.

4. On November 20, 2018 gas hydrates energy, CMS reapproved the Kentucky HEALTH waiver, including all of the provisions set aside in a previous decision issued by the DC federal district court in Stewart v. Azar, with minor technical changes. On June 29, 2018, the court set aside the Kentucky HEALTH waiver approval and sent the waiver back to HHS to reconsider the following provisions: the work requirement, monthly premiums up to 4% of income, coverage lockouts for failure to timely renew eligibility or timely report a change in circumstances, heightened cost-sharing for non-emergency ER use, and elimination of retroactive eligibility and non-emergency medical transportation. The separate “institution for mental disease” substance use disorder payment waiver was not set aside and was allowed to go into effect.

5. Pennsylvania was granted authority to use Medicaid funds to provide services to adults residing in institutions for mental diseases (IMDs) for short-term acute substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. The state received this authority through an amendment to the state’s only active Section 1115 waiver that specifically targets former foster care youth (FFY) who aged out of foster care while residing in a different state (FFY were previously covered under state plan and due to a change in CMS policy, they have been shifted to coverage under waiver authority). (This waiver tracker does not include/track FFY coverage waivers.) The IMD authority applies to all Medicaid-eligible individuals with SUD (not gasco abu dhabi location just former foster care youth).

GENERAL NOTES: “MLTSS” = Managed long-term services and supports, “BH” = Behavioral health. This table does NOT include family planning waivers (with the exception of Texas’ Healthy Women waiver) or CHIP-only waivers. Some states have multiple waivers, and many waivers are comprehensive and may fall into a few different areas. Pending waivers include new applications, amendments to existing waivers, and renewal/extension requests. State waiver renewals that do not propose changes and amendments that are technical in nature are excluded. Pending waiver applications are not included in this table until they are officially accepted by CMS and posted on Medicaid.gov. This table does NOT capture states mandating managed care through Section 1115 (since waiver authority is not generally required for these initiatives) and does not capture delivery system reform, behavioral health, or LTSS initiatives that do not require Section 1115 expenditure authority/federal funds. For additional details on what is included in each category, see category-specific notes and definitions.