Military projects cancelled by the end of the cold war page 8 alternate history discussion gas and water mix

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Click to expand…Even before the Gorbachev thaw Western companies were licensing their obsolete tech to the Soviet Union – the licenses might be harder to get without a Gorbachev thaw, but they’ll still be available (considering how many Western computing firms were being driven to the wall by competition within the sector, the availability of technology might not be much less than OTL either).

It is interesting to think about how such a catch up might go (and what mistakes and electricity khan academy sabotage might happen during this – in OTL the first case of computer warfare was a case of the Soviets stealing a sabotaged design from the US and using it to control the pumps on the gas lines coming out of Siberia – the thing blew up with a spectacular bang and I suspect the US would be looking to repeat the stunt if the Cold War continued). Has anyone done a history on how the Russians managed to improve their computer infrastructure in OTL? The Russians got much better with computers really fast, and I’ve always been curious how that happened.

And honestly, I think a more hostile US-USSR relationship (but not so hostile that WW3 happens) is better for the survival of the Soviet regime. If the USSR has to allow the US to gain a military advantage over electricity invented it, at the very worst it just means returning to the situation of the 60s (that’s assuming SDI really does turn out to be 90% effective or better), where the US had the advantage but would have been so badly hurt in the process of defeating the USSR that no sane person would want to contemplate a fight. The consequences of even a small portion of Soviet warheads getting through to America’s cities would be more devastating in proportionate terms than all of the damage the Nazis did to the Soviet Union in WW2 (which even though it happened and we have pictures, movies, statistics and written accounts of what happened, still was worse gas laws worksheet than most people can imagine). On the flip side, inflexible hostility from the US would give the Soviets similar benefits that American hostility gives to Cuba – external enemies mean the people rally to the regime.

Click to expand…The X33 and X37 were post-Cold War, so I have doubts that either (but especially the X37) will actually exist in any Soviet Union survives TL. The X33 might as another iteration of the Shuttle II concept that started cropping up after Challenger, but the X37 would almost certainly not, since the lack of easy access gas and supply okc to Russian Soyuzes would mean that NASA would have much more incentive to develop a usable light spaceplane as a rescue vehicle for Freedom (assuming it gets built, which I do assume is fairly likely), and therefore would probably not have the budget or interest in starting another spaceplane program in the late 1990s (remember, it was a NASA program first). If the DoD decides it needs a spaceplane there might be some kind of X37-like program, but more likely it borrows the X38 or whatever NASA comes up with and creates a DoD version (which is what the X37 was in the first place, anyway).

In any case, VentureStar, which was the actual orbital launch vehicle that was supposed to be derived from X33, was not ever going to work (at least for the Lockheed X33; the corresponding OLVs for the Rockwell and McDonnell Douglas proposals were more practical), so that program is almost certainly going to end up canceled. At most it ends up being a testbed for some technologies that end up incorporated in another, more realistic proposal for some kind of OLV, as in Eyes Turned Skywards. Also, the idea of an X37-based global paradrop vehicle is highly impractical, thanks to the long gas laws worksheet answers and work lead time needed to carry out an orbital launch (there is no existing OLV you can launch in 2-3 hours, even the ICBM-derived vehicles), the resemblance to an ICBM launch, the small payload, the difficulty of modifying the X37 to actually carry 12-20 people (especially with gear), and the high degree of vulnerability to defenses at the destination. At most, it ends up being used for classified missions of an unspecified but probably espionage-related nature…or in other words electricity and magnetism exactly what it’s used for in the real world. Whatever that is.

Also, the Power Tower concept for Freedom was abandoned pretty quickly in favor of the Dual Keel, which was basically similar to what we actually got in terms of appearance. Already by the time the Soviet Union fell Freedom had basically turned into what we actually have, less the Russian modules of course. It’s purely budget limitations and Congressional desires that drove that, and those have been extremely consistent from the late 1970s onwards, so are very unlikely to change given a continued Cold War situation unless the Soviets do something like building a Moon base or going to Mars.

The X33 and X37 were post-Cold War, so I have doubts that either (but especially the X37) will actually exist in any Soviet Union survives TL. The X33 might as another iteration of the Shuttle II concept that started cropping up after Challenger, but the X37 would almost certainly not, since the lack of easy access to Russian Soyuzes would mean that NASA would have much more incentive to develop a usable light spaceplane as a rescue vehicle for Freedom (assuming it gets built, which I do assume is fairly likely), and therefore would probably not have the budget gas welder job description or interest in starting another spaceplane program in the late 1990s (remember, it was a NASA program first). If the DoD decides it needs a spaceplane there might be some kind of X37-like program, but more likely it borrows the X38 or whatever NASA comes up with and creates a DoD version (which is what the X37 was in the first place, anyway).

In any case, VentureStar, which was the actual orbital launch vehicle that was supposed to be derived from X33, was not ever going to work (at least for the Lockheed X33; the corresponding OLVs for the Rockwell and McDonnell Douglas proposals were more practical), so that program is almost certainly going to end up canceled. At most it ends up being a testbed for some technologies gas efficient suv 2013 that end up incorporated in another, more realistic proposal for some kind of OLV, as in Eyes Turned Skywards. Also, the idea of an X37-based global paradrop vehicle is highly impractical, thanks to the long lead time needed to carry gas zone pricing out an orbital launch (there is no existing OLV you can launch in 2-3 hours, even the ICBM-derived vehicles), the resemblance to an ICBM launch, the small payload, the difficulty of modifying the X37 to actually carry 12-20 people (especially with gear), and the high degree of vulnerability to defenses at the destination. At most, it ends up being used for classified missions of an unspecified but probably espionage-related nature…or in other words exactly what it’s used for in the real world. Whatever that is.

Also, the Power Tower concept for Freedom was abandoned pretty quickly in favor of the Dual Keel, which was basically similar to what we actually got in terms of appearance. Already by the time the Soviet Union fell Freedom had basically turned into what we actually have, less the Russian modules of course. It’s purely budget limitations and Congressional desires that drove on q gas station okc that, and those have been extremely consistent from the late 1970s onwards, so are very unlikely to change given a continued Cold War situation unless the Soviets do something like building a Moon base or going to Mars.

Click to expand…You’re quite confused about the history. The X33 was a Clinton-era project that was partially inspired by the DC-X program initiated by Reagan, but was not directly building on any Reagan-era program. The entire point of the X33 was to demonstrate SSTO technologies for a follow-on commercial SSTO that was pointed gas lighting up as replacing the Shuttle, i.e. VentureStar. If VentureStar wasn’t going to exist, then X33 wasn’t going to exist, and the reason X33 was canceled was because it became tremendously obvious that VentureStar was not going to work.

In any case, neither the X30 nor the X33 (as it was designed) was actually going to function properly. Both were fundamentally built on mistaken ideas about what kinds of performance were possible and desirable in a spacecraft or spaceplane; for the X30, it was how efficient a hypersonic aircraft could be, for the X33 it was that an SSTO would be the most cost-effective method of delivering payloads into orbit. In reality, it’s so much easier to build a TSTO vehicle with a reasonable payload than an SSTO that the theoretical advantages of the latter simply disappear.