Minnesota teaching certification become a teacher in mn electricity physics problems

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The Minnesota Department of Education Educator Licensing Division ( 651-582-8691) expects all applicants for teaching licensure in the state to graduate from a state-approved teacher preparation program and hold a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Additionally, you must complete a Human Relations course, which is included in all Minnesota approved teacher preparation programs.

Teacher preparation programs attended outside of Minnesota may count if the content of the program is equivalent to that of an approved Minnesota teacher preparation program. If the state in which it is contained recognizes that teacher preparation program for licensure or certification purposes, and if the school is regionally accredited, usually credits will be accepted by the Minnesota Department of Education Educator Licensing Division.

If you did not complete a teacher preparation program in one of the states with a reciprocal licensing agreement (Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, South Dakota, or Iowa), you must also complete one of these approved Human Relations courses in order to be licensed in Minnesota.

Did you complete an online teacher preparation program? In order for Minnesota to accept your credits, the program must be regionally accredited, approved by the state in which it is offered, be a field for which Minnesota offers licenses, and include a supervised practicum and student teaching. Your credits may need to be evaluated by a member agency of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services, with the report sent to the Minnesota Department of Education Educator Licensing Division.

Graduates of foreign teacher preparation programs must have their credits evaluated by a member agency of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services. This evaluation must be sent to the Minnesota Department of Education Educator Licensing Division at the time you apply for your teaching license. Licensure Options

Supervised experience is a necessary part of your Minnesota teacher preparation program. During your program, you will participate in a practicum in which you will observe other teachers and also get a chance to present lessons. This may or may not be at the grade level/subject area in which you plan to teach. You will learn things such as methods of teaching and classroom management skills.

Once you have completed at least three years of your teacher preparation program, you will also participate in a student teaching internship. Under rules of the Minnesota Department of Education, this internship must be at least ten weeks long. Its total duration will depend upon the policies of your teacher preparation program. The classroom you’ll be assigned to will be specific to the grade/age level and content area you plan to teach. Your student teaching performance will be assessed by your classroom teacher mentor and by an official from your teacher preparation program. To participate in a student teaching program, the Minnesota Department of Education will issue you a Limited Intern License, valid for one school year only. Document and Application Requirements

The Minnesota Department of Education requires all applicants for first-time teacher licensure to apply online. You must pay all application fees online via credit card only. Some of the information and documentation you must input into the system includes:

As an applicant for first-time teacher licensure in Minnesota, you must undergo a criminal history background check. This includes a fingerprint check. Your local police station can assist you in this process. Request a fingerprint card by contacting Educator Licensing at 651-582-8691 or by emailing mde.educator-licensing@state.mn.us with your name and mailing address. Only fingerprint cards provided by the Minnesota Department of Education Educator Licensing Division will be accepted. You are responsible for all fees associated with fingerprinting and the background check. Contact Information

**Teacher Retention Sources – U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education, Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey, 1999–2000 (“Public School Teacher Questionnaire,” “Private School Teacher Questionnaire,” and “Public Charter School Teacher Questionnaire”),

State estimations based on analysis by Richard Ingersoll, Professor of Education and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, from the National Center for Education Statistics Student and Staffing Survey, and therefore include a slight margin of error.