Moss creek village. a residential community in concord, north carolina gas x dosage pregnancy

Remember, the HOA is only responsible for getting water to your curb. Anything beyond the curb, including timers, sprinkler heads, etc. is the responsibility of the homeowner (excluding Townhome Owners). The Irrigation Manager’s focus is on the maintenance of the common areas and making sure the system is running properly during the scheduled times and the common grounds are being watered appropriately.

Proper timer programming is crucial to the functionality of the system and it is your responsibility to make sure your timers are set correctly. The clock/timer that you have in your garage is intended to facilitate the opening of your irrigation system on your Lot to the sub main during the specified hour that the timer is set for. This time should coincide with the time that the irrigation zone you live in runs. First, make sure your timer is set properly and it still has its programming. If you are unsure about how to program your timer, check the owner’s manual or consult with an independent landscaper. Many timer instruction manuals are available online.

Then, find your valve box in your yard that houses the electric valves that man your individual zones on your Lot. There will be one valve per zone in your yard. Make sure that these electric valves are all turned off. You may have your clock set, but with these valves turned in the ON position, the clock is being bypassed and not operating according to its purpose. To turn your system from manual setting to clock function, you must turn off the irrigation valves in the valve box in your yard. If the valves will not turn any further to the right, they may need to be unscrewed and rinsed out. Dirt and mulch can get inside the workings and cause them to stick open (thus allowing your system to come on anytime during the day the HOA pressurizes the sub mains at the street). Being that Moss Creek’s irrigation system uses ‘dirty’ water or unfiltered well water instead of city water, there is regular system maintenance that is required to keep your system working properly- cleaning your filter and valves. You should do this at least once or twice a season. In addition, you must make sure that your system only operates one zone in your yard at a time during the hour of scheduled irrigation. The main system is designed to provide a total of 600 gallons of water to each lawn, spread over a one-hour time frame. For example, if your irrigation system has 4 zones, you will need to set your clock to run each separately -for say 15 minutes each. A good tip is to water side yard zones for less time and rotor zones longer and not to waste too much of your hour on any drip zones. Broken heads are also a cause of much water waste. Please make sure that all of your heads are in working order. A broken head can waste as many as 25 gallons per minute!

Over-watering your lawn is not only wasteful, but it can lead to diseased turf and growth of fungi. The system is equipped with turf-saturation sensors or rain sensors which will prevent the irrigation from being activated if the ground is saturated to a certain point. A ½ an inch of rain or more activates the system’s rain sensors. Do not over-compensate for a missed irrigation cycle by running multiple zones at once. This abuse of the system could cause you to lose your watering privileges or pay a fine.

The irrigation main lines and sub-mains are not usually pressurized during the daytime. To test or work on your system during business hours OR TO FLAG YOU IRRIGATION HEADS FOR AERATION, fill out the Irrigation Activation Request form on this website using this link or under the Irrigation tab. Note: Irrigation inspections will be done each season. Every Homeowner must have their system running according to the Moss Creek Please see Irrigation Resolution under the Irrigation tab. Irrigation Map and run times are also linked under the Irrigation tab on this homepage. Link to the FAQ page for contractor recommendations from other residents.