Musk interview on 60 minutes – page 7 – chevy bolt ev forum grade 6 electricity project ideas

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Let’s do a back-of-the-envelope calculation to see whether, today, DC fast charging can turn a profit today. gas tax Let’s suppose that a single charging pedestal costs $50,000. Let’s also that the cost of keeping the machine up and running is $250 a month and leasing the land is free because the business owner sees it as a benefit to them. If we assume we’re going to run the machine for ten years before it needs to be replaced and assume about 4.75% interest for amortization, we need to make back $6,250 each year, plus $3000 for maintenance for $9250 total. Let’s assume we charge $0.25 per minute and electricity costs average out to be $0.05 for that minute, resulting in a margin of $0.20 per minute. If we calculate that, $9250 / $0.20 per minute = 46,250 minutes of charging needed at this station per year to break even. Let’s assume a typical charging session is 25 minutes, that means we need 46250/25 = 1,850 sessions per year, or 5 25-minute sessions per day. (Or we can say there are 365 × 24 × 60 = 525,600 minutes in a year, so 46,250/525,600 = 8.8% utilization, at every stall, all day every day.)

So no, I think most providers aren’t likely to be making money right now on having a freeway network. Right now they’re investing in the future. gas monkey monster truck driver I am at least encouraged that it seems like it could be the case that a $50,000 charger actually can be paid off by charging, at least if we make some fairly generous assumptions about how long it’ll be in service and how low overheads and electricity costs might be.

I think the EA program as a result of the VW scandal was brilliant. The charging infrastructure could be argued that it’s one of those industries (like EV adoption, space travel, satellites, CDC, etc) that can only get off the ground with help from the government. If the administration sees a greater good at some realistic point in the future, it’s an investment that not only should be made but without it, might take generations before it becomes commercially viable.

For now, it seems the only totally private infrastructure can only survive when the true costs are passed on to the end consumer, entirely. It’s up to Tesla to justify those fees as a part of ownership and that the owners agree that the value is there. It seems to be working. For now, the supercharge network is an island unto itself. As long as they continue to support it with growth, maintenance, and pay the bills, the Tesla owners rarely would need anything else, especially when paired with the market absorption of destination chargers.

So the majority of vehicle ‘types’ may be shipping with CCS, the the majority of vehicles is definitely in Tesla’s favor – by a huge margin. Once all the other vendors *combined* equal what Tesla puts out in a year you can *start* thinking about the "which non-Tesla plug type is the defacto standard" discussion. Even when all the other vendors together equal the EV output of Tesla, they will have a several-hundred-thousand vehicle deficit to make up.

Well, the J-1772 is the defacto standard – every Tesla can use it (using the adaptor that comes with the car). gas house For fast-charging, the Tesla plug is the defacto standard (in the U.S.). And it will remain that until a bunch of vehicle manufacturers stop limiting themselves to announcements and compliance cars, and ship EVs in quantity. If most vendors were shipping "about" the same level of EVs of Nissan or GM, then the topic is a reasonable subject for discussion. Until that point arrives, it’s just forum masturbation.

But frankly, I have never understood the animosity towards Tesla. I think Elon is somewhat deranged (based on his public persona) and there are quite a few Tesla fan-boys who are definitely in the "mine is shinier ha-ha–ha-ha you poor sods" camp. (There are even Bolt fans who are waaaaaay too far into the "the Bolt is better than anything" camp, as evidenced by some on this forum.) But Tesla has done a **** of a lot to shine a huge light on EVs and make it obvious that EVs can definitely be mainstream. electricity notes pdf And the total number of EVs sold in the US today, by all vendors, *combined* is but a drop in the bucket compared to the ICE vehicles sold.

I don’t think it’s hard to say at all. Tesla may lead in sales numbers, but with existing and upcoming vehicles it’s pretty obvious that the vast majority of vehicle types will be using CCS. That’s going to make it the de facto standard. In a few years CHAdeMO is going to be irrelevant and Tesla is going to be the odd man out. gas variables pogil answers extension questions The only question in my mind is how long it will take for Tesla to relent and start using CCS, ’cause it sure as heck isn’t going to go the other way around.

If you take Tesla out of the equation since they will be adding the majority of new EV’s for the next few years, you can’t discount the popularity that the Leaf or Kona may have. Especially considering that the average sales price of a new car is around $34k, the Bolt and it’s competition will be determining most popular, not the I-Pace or the Porsche. In that arena, what are the CCS models coming on board? The Germans haven’t really made a dent but the Japanese cars certainly vie for that price point and could overwhelm the Bolts numbers.

I think an emphasis should be made that that is their GLOBAL production for the Model 3. Now, if you want to throw the Model S and X into the mix, it means that Tesla might be selling 30,000 EVs a month globally. There’s no doubt that is really good, but when you start to tally up what the various other automakers are selling globally, the numbers don’t seem so overwhelming.

The biggest advantage that Tesla maintains right now is access to batteries, and that is the primary bottleneck most other automakers are dealing with. However, that won’t be an advantage that Tesla enjoys for long because just the battery factories that are currently being constructed or expanded in the United States alone surpass the Gigafactory’s production capacity. If GM, Hyundai, Kia, and Nissan had unlimited access to batteries, their combined EV sales numbers in the United States could easily match the 20,000 Model 3s we are currently seeing delivered each month.

To your last point, batteries will definitely be the bottleneck for all the other vendors as they fight for what’s available. You seem to make a habit out of pointing to what’s on the horizon with future plans from the latest Tesla killers being better, bigger, more, etc. than what Tesla currently has. arkansas gas tax It’s kinda pointless when you discount the fact that Tesla continues to expand their production too. Let me know when some other company that supplies batteries to a US available car has exceeded Tesla’s output in real time.

I think an emphasis should be made that that is their GLOBAL production for the Model 3. Now, if you want to throw the Model S and X into the mix, it means that Tesla might be selling 30,000 EVs a month globally. There’s no doubt that is really good, but when you start to tally up what the various other automakers are selling globally, the numbers don’t seem so overwhelming.

The biggest advantage that Tesla maintains right now is access to batteries, and that is the primary bottleneck most other automakers are dealing with. However, that won’t be an advantage that Tesla enjoys for long because just the battery factories that are currently being constructed or expanded in the United States alone surpass the Gigafactory’s production capacity. If GM, Hyundai, Kia, and Nissan had unlimited access to batteries, their combined EV sales numbers in the United States could easily match the 20,000 Model 3s we are currently seeing delivered each month.

I forgot to add to your bolded comment above, what makes you think they can sell any more than they already do? Just because they can do something doesn’t mean they will. I hope I’m wrong though as it would be a tremendous Tesla goal to get the legacy automakers to exceed Tesla’s output. I’m sure he’ll have something to add to this in tonight’s interview for those that think he wants to eliminate the competition.