Net metering guide mass.gov gas bloating

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If you are a customer of a regulated electric company (Eversource, National Grid, or Unitil), you may net meter. Net metering allows you to generate your own electricity to offset your electricity usage. Common examples of net metering facilities include solar panels on a home or a wind turbine at a school. These facilities are connected to a meter, which measure the net quantity of electricity that you use. When you use electricity from the electric company, your meter spins forward. When you generate excess electricity and “export” electricity to the electric grid, your meter spins backward.

Massachusetts does not differentiate between behind-the-meter net metering (electricity generation consumed on the same site it is generated) versus virtual net metering (electricity generation consumed at a site other than where the electricity is generated). For most purposes, including credit calculation, there is no difference between net metering and virtual net metering. Net metering facilities

State law requires that the electric companies must have separate net metering caps for public and private net metering facilities in the general net metering program gas konigsforst (GP). St. 2010, c. 359, s. 29.00. Each GP cap is equal to a percentage of each electric company’s highest historical peak load, which is the most electricity consumed by the electric company’s customers at any one time.

• If your net consumption is negative, you will receive a net metering credit on your electricity bill. Therefore, you will not owe the electric company money during that billing period. 220 CMR 18.03(3). The net metering credits appear as a dollar amount (not as kilowatt hours) on your bill. The credits never expire and will rollover to the next billing period.

• Plug the values into the credit formula and determine the value of a credit for each unit of excess electricity (in kilowatt hours) produced by your net metering facility. Be aware, that the electric companies’ schedule of rates changes often. For example, basic service rates for residential customers change every six months. Also, each electric company’s schedule of rates is different.

• The type and capacity of the facility determine your net metering class. To determine the capacity of a solar net metering facility, use 80% of the facility electricity dance moms full episode’s kW DC capacity. If the solar net metering facility is cap exempt, use the nameplate rating (kW AC). To determine the capacity of a wind net metering facility, anaerobic digestion net metering facility, or small hydroelectric net metering facility, use the nameplate rating. G.L. c. 164 §§ 139(f) and 139A(a); 220 CMR 18.07(4).

• If your net metering facility is a Class III net metering facility (has a capacity of more than 1 MW) or is in the SHP, your electric company may pay the host customer for the value of some or all of its net metering credits from excess generation, instead of applying the credits inert gas definition chemistry to the electric account(s). This decision is left entirely to the electric company. The electric company must notify the host customer whether it will purchase the value of the credits (cash out) or allocate net metering credits to future bills before the facility is operational. G.L. c. 164, § 139(b)(1); G.L. c. 164, § 139A(b), 220 CMR 18.05(4).

In April 2016, the Solar Energy Act created different net metering credits values for solar net metering facilities. Before the Solar Energy Act, solar net metering facilities generated standard net metering credits under the old regime. After the Solar Energy Act, certain solar net metering facilities generate market net metering credits under the new regime.

• Solar net metering facilities that are not cap exempt and that submitted a complete application for a cap allocation by September 26, 2016, and obtained a cap allocation by January 8, 2017, generate standard net metering credits for 25 years from the date on which they were first authorized to interconnect to the electric grid, if the facility obtained a cap allocation by January 8, 2017. D.P.U. 16-64-H at 5.

• Solar net metering facilities that are not cap exempt and that submitted a complete application for a cap allocation after September 26, 2016, or that submitted a complete application for a cap allocation by September 26, 2016 but did not obtain a cap allocation by January 8, 2017, will receive market net metering credits equal to 60% of the net excess kilowatt hours if they receive a cap allocation after January 8, 2017. 220 CMR 18.02, 18.04(3), (4), and (6).

• Cap exempt facilities that are solar net metering facilities that were interconnected in the old regime and electricity bill calculator that later (i.e., after September 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m.) expand and remain a Class I net metering facility will generate 100% net metering credits for 25 years from the date upon which the facility was first authorized to interconnect to the electric distribution system. 16-64-H at 4.

• Grandfathered facilities that are solar net metering facilities electricity 4th grade that were interconnected in the old regime and that later (i.e., after September 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m.) expand, and remain a Class I net metering facility will generate 100% net metering credits for 25 years from the date upon which the facility was first authorized to interconnect to the electric distribution system. 16-64-H at 5.

• New solar net metering facilities that are designated as agricultural net metering facilities and retain this designation will generate 100% net metering credits for 25 years from the date upon which the facility was first authorized to interconnect to the electric distribution system. After 25 years, the new solar net metering facility that is an agricultural net metering facility will transition to 60% market net metering credits. G.L. c. 164, §§ 138, 139; D.P.U. 17-10-A at 29. To apply for the agricultural net metering facility status, submit an application to the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.

The host customer of a net metering facility determines what happens to the net metering credits a facility generates by submitting a form called Schedule Z to the electric company. A host customer may change Schedule Z no more than twice in one calendar year, unless there is mutual agreement to change it more often. Contact your electric company for more information about Schedule Z. G.L. c. 164 wd gaster, § 139(b)(1).

If you allocate net metering credits to a public entity, there is no effect on the public entity’s 10 MW limit. A public entity may receive an unlimited amount of net metering credits with no effect on its 10 MW limit. The capacity of a net metering facility within the public cap only affects the host customer’s 10 MW limit. Time of use rates

Time of use (TOU) rates are rate designs with a peak and off peak rate. Commercial and industrial electric customers may be on a TOU rate, provided that the customer meets the requirements to be on the TOU rate. For more information on the TOU rate, consult the electric company’s TOU tariff. Only NSTAR Electric (Eversource Energy) and National Grid offer a TOU rate for residential customers. If you are on a TOU rate, you will generate net metering credits based on the TOU rate.