News – sublime text gas jet compressor

With the release of Sublime Text 3.0, we refreshed the visual design for the application, icon, and website. The new icon ties into the colors and shapes of the old, but is more abstract and fits well with other modern applications. The updated Default theme is still distinctly Sublime Text, but has full high DPI support, and works well with both dark and light color schemes. The three new color schemes take advantage of the work that has gone into modernizing and enhancing the syntax definitions included with Sublime Text. Sublime Text 3 Build 3126

As well as an overhaul of the default theme, we’ve also include a new theme, Adaptive, which uses the colors of your color scheme and applies variations of them to the side bar and various panels. The new color scheme setting accent is used to highlight selected options in the find panel, and to highlight modified tabs. Furthermore, on recent versions of macOS the title bar is also styled by the Adaptive theme to follow your selected color scheme.

Compared to the last beta, 3.0 brings a refreshed UI theme, new color schemes, and a new icon. Some of the other highlights are big syntax highlighting improvements, touch input support on Windows, Touch Bar support on macOS, and apt/yum/pacman repositories for Linux.

I wanted to highlight some of the changes from Sublime Text 2 here, however it’s surprisingly hard: virtually every aspect of the editor has been improved in some way, and even a list of the major changes would be too long. If you’d like to see the full list of changes, the team has made a dedicated page for them.

Certainly there are big features that 3.0 has: Goto Definition, a new syntax highlighting engine, a new UI, and an expanded API. However the difference is frequently felt in the hundreds of improvements that don’t warrant being featured on their own: spell checking works better, automatic indentation does the right thing more often, word wrapping handles source code better, high DPI screens are properly supported, and Goto Anything is smarter. There’s too much to list, but combined the difference is night and day.

One of the areas I’m especially proud of in Sublime Text 3 is performance: it’s significantly faster than Sublime Text 2 along every axis. Startup is faster, opening files is faster, and scrolling is more efficient. While it’s a much larger application than 2, it feels leaner.

When indexing is in progress, several low priority background processes will be launched to do the work, and a progress indicator will be shown on the status bar. In general, even for large projects, indexing should take only a few seconds, and be unobtrusive.

• A corrupted index. Various events can cause the index itself to become corrupted, and when this happens, Sublime Text will do the indexing work, but be unable to write the results to disk, so it’ll start again in the near future. The next build of Sublime Text will handle this situation more gracefully, but in the mean time you can check this for yourself: if the index is corrupted, there will be a log message in the console (accessible from the View/Show Console menu), which indicates which directory needs to be deleted to reset the index.

• Some files. File indexing works by applying syntax highlighting rules to each file, and then extracting everything that looks like a symbol. The syntax highlighting rules are regex based, and some combinations of rules and files can cause the parsing to take a long time. See below to find out what’s going on, and then consider adding the files to the index_exclude_patterns setting.