Not enough superlatives to describe it! – review of southward car museum, paraparaumu, new zealand – tripadvisor electricity around the world

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Awesome and Amazing don’t seem to do justice to the high quality and sheer size of this collection put together by one extraordinary individual with tastes that were at once wide-ranging and very discriminating. Mr. Southward clearly knew electricity invented what year the best when he saw it, and took great care at considerable expense to find the rarest, the most interesting, and the most historically valuable vehicles. He lived to be 98 years old, and this was a lifelong project. Good on you, Mr. Southward, and lucky for us.

But the Southward is a cut above. Among other laudable achievements, it offers superior interpretation. Signs don’t just tell the make, model, year, engine size, and other basic details electricity resistance questions, relying on you to fill in the gas efficient suv 2010 blanks. Here, they include short histories of the people and companies who made the cars, often those who owned them, too. They seem to dredge up all manner of interesting details on design, performance, and peculiarities, both good and bad. In many ways, the failures are even more interesting than the successes. It’s all fascinating.

1897 Lux: One of only a few Lux cars left in the world, from the German company, Lux-Werke, that started out making equipment for gas lighting, added an automotive department, and was out of business by 1902…. Awesome gas x strips directions and Amazing don’t seem to do justice to the high quality and sheer size of this collection put together by one extraordinary individual with tastes electricity transmission and distribution costs that were at once wide-ranging and very discriminating. Mr. Southward clearly knew the best when he saw it, and took great care at considerable expense to find the rarest, the most interesting, and the most historically valuable vehicles. He lived to be 98 years old, and this was a lifelong project. Good on you, Mr. Southward, and lucky for us. There are cars here that we have never seen anywhere, and we have visited many auto museums, including some considered the best gas vs electric stove cost. But the Southward is a cut above. Among other laudable achievements, it offers superior interpretation. Signs don’t just tell the make, model, year, engine size, and other basic details, relying on you to fill in the blanks. Here, they gas 87 89 93 include short histories of the people and companies who made the cars, often those who owned them, too. They seem to dredge up all manner of interesting details on design, performance, and peculiarities, both good and bad. In many ways, the failures are even more interesting than the successes. It’s all fascinating. Here are few highlights: 1897 Lux: One of only a few Lux cars left in the world, from the German company, Lux-Werke, that started out making equipment for gas gas utility cost lighting, added an automotive department, and was out of business by 1902. Where else could you see one of these? Have you even heard of a Lux car? I hadn’t. 1915 Stutz Indianapolis Racer: Iconic racer from the very early days. Took 3rd place at Indianapolis in 1915 and 2nd place in 1919. A classic beauty in red and white. 1936 Morgan: Shiny red 3 wheeler powered by a Matchless motorcycle engine. Originally electricity grid uk created by H.F.S. Morgan as a single-seater for his own personal use, the Morgan evolved into today’s 4-wheel sports car. Morgan remains one gaslighting examples of the last motor companies still owned by the family whose name it carries. 1955 Mercedes Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe: Cutting-edge sports car design combined with new technologies such as mechanical fuel injection made this the super car its day. It was also the fastest: first to top 161 MPH. Straight up, it’s the most gorgeous car I’ve ever seen. Early 1950s Vincent Black Shadow Motorcycle: Small cheapest gas in texas production, mostly hand-built motorcycle with technological innovations that made it the super bike of its day. There is plenty here to see, with very good historical and often intriguing personal context. Bottom line: The Southward Car Museum is not to be missed if you are anywhere near electricity terms and definitions the Kapiti coast. HOW TO GET THERE: From Wellington, it’s an easy and scenic trip on the Kapiti Train Line departing from Wellington Station. Get off at the Paraparaumu stop (next-to-last). In the commercial area right near the station, you’ll see signs to the Kapiti i-SITE, where the friendly staff can help by ordering a cab to pick you up at the nearby taxi stand. Cost is NZS$ 16 one-way. You can arrange with the driver to call him or her directly for pick-up at the museum u gas cedar hill mo and return to the train station. Unfortunately, there is no bus or shuttle service to the museum. More Show less