Note to ocasio-cortez and green new dealers the economy is not the government 850 gas block

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Yes, the nation faces problems, some very serious. However, if history is any kind of teacher — and it usually is — a bigger, more intrusive government isn’t going to solve America’s tough challenges; the private sector is. Even a cursory look at the original New Deal, clearly admired by AOC and her progressive electricity generation efficiency compatriots, reveals that FDR’s progressive economic strategy, grounded in government intervention and government-funded jobs, achieved only limited progress in righting the nation’s spiraling economy.

When Roosevelt took office in March 1933, unemployment in the prior year had been 23.6 percent — an almost unimaginable number today. One of his first New Deal programs, the National Industrial Recovery Act, or NIRA, limited competition and put wage and price controls in place on a number of industries — all in the name of putting people back to work. But the results tell a different story.

By 1935, unemployment had only dipped to 20.1 percent. It got as low as 14.3 percent in 1937 and then began climbing back to 17.2 percent in 1939. It was only America’s entry into World War II that saw unemployment drop significantly as those in the Armed services rose from 540,000 in 1940 to 11.4 million by 1944. The New Deal didn’t revive the American economy; WWII did.

Whether it was the NIRA or many other programs like the Civilian Conservation Corps or the Works Progress Administration, designed to create government-funded jobs, the programs did provide some employment, if temporary, for some people. But in the end, it took gas z factor World War II to finally get unemployment to mid single digits. The debate over the New Deal and its impact continues today, but looking at its record of creating real jobs, it’s fair to question what would have happened in 1933, or 2009 for that matter, if the federal government’s approach to unemployment had reflected a belief in the ability of the private sector, not the public sector, to create jobs?

In February 2009, newly inaugurated President Barack Obama and the Democrat-controlled Congress passed a stimulus bill to address what at that point was an unemployment rate of 8.3 percent. People were promised “shovel-ready” projects that would create plenty of new jobs. They were promised a focus on government “investment” in green energy k electric company. They were promised an economic turnaround.

As the Obama administration picked green energy winners and losers for government guarantees, it hailed Solyndra as a poster child for public-private partnerships that would change energy production as we know it. Department of Energy bureaucrats approved a $535 million federal loan guarantee despite a raft of financial red flags flying over the highly touted “green” company. But two years later, Solyndra was bankrupt, 1,100 jobs were lost, and taxpayers got stiffed with a $528 million bill.

Today’s Green New Deal shares many of FDR’s original goals, but like the old New Deal, it reflects an economic philosophy that has a long track record of promising much and producing less. Today, one party thinks government is the answer to people’s problems. The other rightly thinks only the private sector can create the kind of economic opportunity and growth that helps ensure “prosperity and economic security for all.”

Yes, the nation faces problems, some very serious. However, if history is any kind of teacher — and it usually is — a bigger, more intrusive government gas used in ww1 isn’t going to solve America’s tough challenges; the private sector is. Even a cursory look at the original New Deal, clearly admired by AOC and her progressive compatriots, reveals that FDR’s progressive economic strategy, grounded in government intervention and government-funded jobs, achieved only limited progress in righting the nation’s spiraling economy.

When Roosevelt took office in March 1933, unemployment in the prior year had been 23.6 percent — an almost unimaginable number today. One of his first New Deal programs, the National Industrial Recovery Act, or NIRA, limited competition and put wage and price controls in place on a number of industries — all in the name of putting people back to work. But the results tell a different story.

By 1935, unemployment had only dipped to 20.1 percent. It got as low as 14.3 percent in 1937 and then began climbing back to 17.2 percent in 1939. It was only America’s entry into World War II that saw unemployment drop significantly as those in the Armed services rose from 540,000 in 1940 to 11.4 million by 1944. The New Deal didn’t revive the American economy; WWII did.

Whether it was a gas mixture is made by combining the NIRA or many other programs like the Civilian Conservation Corps or the Works Progress Administration, designed to create government-funded jobs, the programs did provide some employment, if temporary, for some people. But in the end, it took World War II to finally get unemployment to mid single digits. The debate over the New Deal and its impact continues today, but looking at its record of creating real jobs, it’s fair to question what would have happened in 1933, or 2009 for that matter, if the federal government’s approach to unemployment had reflected a belief in the ability of the private sector, not the public sector, to create jobs?

In February 2009, newly inaugurated President Barack Obama and the Democrat-controlled Congress passed a stimulus bill to address what at that point was an unemployment rate of 8.3 percent. People were promised “shovel-ready” projects that gas stoichiometry formula would create plenty of new jobs. They were promised a focus on government “investment” in green energy. They were promised an economic turnaround.

As the Obama administration picked green energy winners and losers for government guarantees, it hailed c gastritis im antrum Solyndra as a poster child for public-private partnerships that would change energy production as we know it. Department of Energy bureaucrats approved a $535 million federal loan guarantee despite a raft of financial red flags flying over the highly touted “green” company. But two years later, Solyndra was bankrupt, 1,100 jobs were lost, and taxpayers got stiffed with a $528 million bill.

Today’s Green New Deal shares many of FDR’s original goals, but like the old New Deal, it reflects an economic philosophy that has a long track record of promising much and producing less. Today, one party thinks government is the answer to people’s problems. The other rightly thinks only the private sector can create the kind of economic opportunity and growth that helps ensure “prosperity and economic security for all.”