Nyag eric schneiderman resigns after 4 women allege abuse – story kdfw electricity units of measurement

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NEW YORK (AP) — New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who had taken on high-profile roles as an advocate for women’s issues and an antagonist to the policies of President Donald Trump, announced late Monday that he would be resigning from office hours after four women he was romantically involved with accused him of physical violence in accounts published by The New Yorker.

Schneiderman, who had been running for re-election, said he contested the women’s accounts, but "while these allegations are unrelated to my professional conduct or the operations of the office, they will effectively prevent me from leading the office’s work at this critical time." He said he would resign at the close of business on Tuesday.

Two women had spoken to The New Yorker on the record, saying Schneiderman repeatedly hit them during the course of their relationships with him in recent years, and never with their consent. Neither woman filed any police complaints, but both said they sought out medical attention and confided in people close to them about the abuse.

A third woman who also was involved with him told her story to the other two women, but said she was too frightened to come forward. A fourth woman said Schneiderman slapped her when she rebuffed him, but also asked to remain unidentified. The New Yorker said it vetted the third woman’s allegations, and saw a photo of what the fourth woman said was her injury.

The two women who spoke on the record, Michelle Manning Barish and Tanya Selvaratnam, both said the physical abuse escalated over time, including choking and hitting, and that Schneiderman also was a heavy drinker. The Associated Press is identifying the women because they agreed to tell their stories publicly.

On Twitter, after the story was published, Manning Barish said, "After the most difficult month of my life-I spoke up. For my daughter and for all women. I could not remain silent and encourage other women to be brave for me. I could not…"

Schneiderman, a Democrat, had issued a statement to The New Yorker saying, "In the privacy of intimate relationships, I have engaged in role-playing and other consensual sexual activity. I have not assaulted anyone. I have never engaged in non-consensual sex, which is a line I would not cross."

His representatives sent the same statement to The Associated Press when asked about the accusations. They also sent a statement from his ex-wife, Jennifer Cunningham, who said, "I’ve known Eric for nearly 35 years as a husband, father and friend. These allegations are completely inconsistent with the man I know, who has always been someone of the highest character, outstanding values and a loving father. I find it impossible to believe these allegations are true."

Schneiderman has been a vocal supporter of the #MeToo movement. He filed a lawsuit in February against movie producer Harvey Weinstein and the Weinstein Co. following an investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct, saying the company broke New York law by failing to protect employees from "pervasive sexual harassment, intimidation and discrimination."

Schneiderman, who won a state Senate seat representing a Manhattan district in 1998, became attorney general in 2010 and had been running for re-election this year. He has a history of recognition for activism on behalf of women’s causes, including reproductive rights.

The 63-year-old also has been a longtime critic of President Donald Trump and has been part of several efforts to push back against some of his actions in the White House, like the rescinding of protection for immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

A Republican opponent, Manny Alicandro, had just officially launched his candidacy on Monday. After The New Yorker report, Alicandro said, "If true, he is a disgrace and wholly unfit for the role of New York State’s chief legal officer. I believe the accusers."

"No one is above the law, including New York’s top legal officer. I will be asking an appropriate New York District Attorney to commence an immediate investigation, and proceed as the facts merit. My personal opinion is that, given the damning pattern of facts and corroboration laid out in the article, I do not believe it is possible for Eric Schneiderman to continue to serve as Attorney General, and for the good of the office, he should resign." –New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

"New Yorkers deserve and expect more from their Attorney General, who as the state’s chief law enforcement officer has an obligation to uphold the law. Eric Schneiderman must step down immediately." –New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, D-Manhattan

"The violent actions described by multiple women in this story are abhorrent. Based on this extensive and serious reporting, I do not believe that Eric Schneiderman should continue to serve as Attorney General. There should be a full and immediate investigation into these credible allegations." –U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.

"As Eric Schneiderman would say, kudos to "the brave women and men who spoke up about the sexual harassment they had endured at the hands of powerful men." I don’t see how Schneiderman survives this, nor should he. Aside from being one of the most political, partisan State AG’s in our nation’s history, he is exactly what he claims to be fighting against. An Attorney General of all people should know that he can’t consent on behalf of the woman he is assaulting. He may be going to sleep tonight as New York’s Attorney General, but he should be waking up tomorrow morning as a man with a resignation announcement and apology as the least of his worries." –U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y.