Oxycodone coupon – free prescription savings at pharmacies nationwide grade 9 electricity questions

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Oxycodone comes as a solution (liquid), concentrate solution, tablet, capsule, and extended-release (long-acting) tablet to take by mouth. The solution, concentrated solution, tablet, and capsule are usually taken with or without food every 4 to 6 hours, either as needed for pain or as regularly scheduled medications. The extended-release tablet are usually taken every 12 hours. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take oxycodone exactly as directed.

If you are taking the oxycodone concentrate solution, be sure to carefully measure and double check the dose before taking the medication. Use the measuring dropper that comes with the medication to measure your dose. Mix the medication with at least 1 ounce (30 milliliters) of juice or other liquid, or with a semi-solid food such as applesauce or pudding. If you are taking oxycodone concentrate solution from an ampoule (small pre-packaged tube containing oxycodone liquid), be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions for taking a dose. Ask your pharmacist or doctor if you have any questions about measuring your dose or taking your medication.

Your doctor will likely start you on a low dose of oxycodone and may increase this dose over time if your pain is not controlled. After you take oxycodone for a period of time, your body may become used to the medication. If this happens, your doctor may need to increase your dose to control your pain. Talk to your doctor about how you are feeling during your treatment with oxycodone.

Oxycodone can be habit-forming. Do not take a larger dose, take it more often, or take it for a longer period of time than prescribed by your doctor. If you have been taking oxycodone for more than a few days, do not stop taking oxycodone suddenly. If you stop taking this medication suddenly, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as restlessness, watery eyes, runny nose, sneezing, yawning, sweating, chills, muscle or joint aches or pains, weakness, irritability, anxiety, depression, difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, fast heartbeat, and fast breathing. Your doctor will probably decrease your dose gradually. Call your doctor if you have any withdrawal symptoms when your dose is decreased or when you stop taking oxycodone.

tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxycodone, codeine (in many pain relievers and cough medications), hydrocodone (in Hycodan, in Lortab, in Vicoprofen, others),dihydrocodeine (in Synalgos-DC, others), any other medications, or any of the ingredients in oxycodone liquid, tablets, or capsules. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.

tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: antidepressants; antihistamines; buprenorphine (Buprenex, Subutex, in Suboxone); butorphanol (Stadol); medications for mental illness, nausea, or seizures; other medications for pain, especially narcotics; muscle relaxants; nalbuphine (Nubain); naloxone (Narcan); nalmefene (Revex); pentazocine (Talwin); sedatives;sleeping pills, or tranquilizers; Also tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking the following medications or if you have stopped taking them within the past two weeks: isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.

tell your doctor if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol and if you use or have ever used street drugs, or if you have overused prescription medications. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had a head injury,a tumor in your brain or nervous system, any condition causing increased pressure in your brain; hypothyroidism (condition in which the thyroid gland produces less hormone than normal), hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist); delirium tremens (severe withdrawal symptoms that may occur in people who drank large amounts of alcohol over time and have stopped drinking); kyphoscoliosis (curving of the spine that may cause breathing problems) low blood pressure;Addison’s disease (condition in which the adrenal gland does not produce enough hormone), seizures; urethral stricture (blockage of the tube that allows urine to leave the body), enlarged prostate (a male reproductive gland), or heart, kidney,liver, or pancreas, or biliary tract disease.

• you should know that oxycodone may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting when you get up too quickly from a lying position. To help avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up.