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The benefits of regular physical activity are undeniable. gas news in hindi Even if you are a stroke survivor or been inactive for years, you can start making small, healthy changes. Physical activity reduces some stroke risks and improves heart function and lipid profile by lowering cholesterol. It also lowers blood pressure and resting heart rate. Being active reduces the severity of diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity and improves strength, balance, endurance and long-term brain health. For stroke survivors, these benefits can spell the difference between dependence and independence.

She starts with 10 minutes of pedaling on a portable exercise cycle she puts in front of her chair. Then she does a balancing exercise — standing on both feet, she raises her arms to shoulder height, closes her eyes and counts to 60. Holding onto her walker, she does 20 steps in place, bringing her knees as high as the handholds on her walker. Then she does a routine of 14 exercises 20 times each; she increases benefit by adding 2.5 lb weights, strapped to her wrists or ankles depending on the exercise. “I started out doing each one 30 times, but it tired me out too much,” Lorraine said.

The benefits of regular physical activity are undeniable. Even if you are a stroke survivor or been inactive for years, you can start making small, healthy changes. Physical activity reduces some stroke risks and improves heart function and lipid profile by lowering cholesterol. It also lowers blood pressure and resting heart rate. Being active reduces the severity of diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity and improves strength, balance, endurance and long-term brain health. electricity water analogy For stroke survivors, these benefits can spell the difference between dependence and independence.

She starts with 10 minutes of pedaling on a portable exercise cycle she puts in front of her chair. Then she does a balancing exercise — standing on both feet, she raises her arms to shoulder height, closes her eyes and counts to 60. Holding onto her walker, she does 20 steps in place, bringing her knees as high as the handholds on her walker. gas mask art Then she does a routine of 14 exercises 20 times each; she increases benefit by adding 2.5 lb weights, strapped to her wrists or ankles depending on the exercise. “I started out doing each one 30 times, but it tired me out too much,” Lorraine said. Expert testimony

Many survivors with disabilities are put off by the general physical activity prescription of 30–45 minutes of aerobic exercise most days of the week. Physiatrist Dr. Elizabeth Pegg Frates is assistant director of medical education for the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine and a clinical instructor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, both at Harvard School of Medicine. She emphasized that most survivors are capable of some activity depending on their functional abilities. “The exercise prescription needs to be individualized for each survivor based on interests, strengths and current level of fitness,” Dr. Frates said. In her book, Life After stroke: The Guide to Recovering Your Health and Preventing Another Stroke, she and her co-authors created four categories to help with selecting an appropriate type of physical activity. The four categories are:

Those with severe limitations (e.g., paralyzed on one side of the body and spending significant amounts of time in bed) may do their exercises sitting in a chair and get assistance doing range of motion exercises with their affected limbs. electricity generation by country They may be able to do neck stretches, knee lifts, ankle rotations, and flexing and extending their elbows and wrists on the unaffected side of their body.

There are three main ingredients in aerobic physical activity: intensity, duration and frequency. Whether you engaged in physical activity before your stroke or not, begin any new physical activity regimen slowly. “An exercise session that is completed at a low intensity is better than no exercise session at all,” Dr. Frates said. “Moderate intensity, when you can talk but not sing, might be possible for some survivors, depending on their level of heart health and overall fitness.”

Many survivors come to post-stroke physical activity after a long period of convalescence during which their muscles have atrophied and they have lost aerobic capacity. “A reasonable goal for someone in that condition is accumulating 10 minutes of physical activity each day or over the course of a day,” Dr. Frates said. “That can be broken into two five-minute segments. With the guidance of their physician they might be able to add five minutes after a week or so depending on how things are going.”

Frequency is also important. The exercise prescription is to be active most days of the week. Lorraine Essig goes through her 40-minute workout three days a week. As survivors increase their strength and endurance, they may be able to increase the frequency. “It is best to progress at a slow and steady pace that is comfortable,” Dr. gas relief while pregnant Frates said.

Motivation can be a huge issue. To find out what motivates you or the person in your care to engage in physical activity, go over the benefits — weight loss, lower blood pressure, more strength, better mood, more independence and better overall health. What gets you excited? Is it the thought of losing weight or having more energy or better balance or the independence that comes with greater strength?

Then set a three-month goal such as exercising for 30 minutes five days a week. “Realizing it will take three months to get there, set a concrete goal for the first week,” Dr. Frates said. “For example, a reasonable goal for a survivor who has mild functional limitations and has been sedentary for years would be to exercise for 10 minutes three days a week. Selecting the time of day and putting it in a calendar helps.”

Keeping a physical activity log where you can chart progress is another way to stay motivated. Working out with a friend or joining an exercise group makes it more fun and keeps you accountable. The social support of family and friends is also important. Dr. gas and supply shreveport Rose’s advice to family members: “Encourage small steps and be supportive in any small step that is taken. Family members should realize that it can be intimidating to exercise in public. Since everyone can benefit from physical activity, family members can be supportive by joining the exercise class or the gym and exercising with their survivors.”

Selecting a physical activity the survivor doesn’t like is another de-motivator. Just because a caregiver or therapist thinks water aerobics is a good idea doesn’t mean the survivor will. Remember to keep the physical activity regimen engaging and interesting to prevent boredom. “Varying the type of physical activity can be one way to keep survivors motivated,” Dr. electricity in india first time Frates said. New horizons

Visual reality devices like the Nintendo Wii (pronounced “wee”) may give survivors with disabilities a fun way to exercise. “Any time physical activity doesn’t ‘feel’ like exercise, people are more apt to stick with it,” Dr. Rose said. “Anecdotally, physical therapists report their patients enjoy exercising with the Wii, and that they are getting a workout. Research is currently underway to understand the potential specific benefits.”

Besides fun, these devices provide a variety of activities and give instant feedback on a player’s skill. “There are anecdotal benefits, including enhanced compliance with training sessions and increased training time,” Dr. Frates said. “Visual reality rehabilitation will become more and more popular as more devices are invented. These devices seem to enhance motivation, provide active movement around joints, allow for repetition in an engaging setting and create an interactive interface for the survivor. grade 9 static electricity quiz It will be interesting to see what scientific research tells us about their usefulness in terms of improving function.”

Heart rate is the measure of intensity of an aerobic workout. According to the American Physical Therapy Association guidelines for post-stroke physical activity, survivors should exercise at a level between 40–70 percent of your maximal heart rate, which is 220 minus your age. So for a 70-year-old survivor, maximal heart rate is 150; 40–70 percent of that is a range between 60 and 105 beats per minute (220 — 70 x .40 = 60 and 220 — 70 x .70 = 105). Consider purchasing a strap-on heart rate monitor; devices start at around $50.

Survivor Toni Johnson of Elk Rapids, Michigan had a stroke while skiing in 2002 at age 75. She made skiing again a goal of her recovery, and she has worked hard at it, even after breaking a leg in her first year back on the slopes. With the help of an adaptive sports group, Toni is not only skiing again but riding a recumbent tricycle. She may be an 80-year-old stroke survivor, but she is determined not to act her age!

Saving Strokes, a golf therapy program developed and run by the Western States Affiliate of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, has grown so much. More than 550 survivors have been through the program, and almost 800 more are expected to participate in events this year at 13 sites in California, Nevada and Utah. We have highlighted three California golfers in our coverage: Carl Valdrow, Bill Dodd and John Castiglia.