Pm silent as spy bill approved the tribune gas bloating diarrhea

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“[Dr Minnis] supported the bill now and his support of the bill is at odds with what he had to say about it in the past. They dubbed it a spy bill. The bill is a necessary tool in the fight against crime. As prime minister, at least speak of policy and give some assurance to the citizens at large that the execution would be done in accordance with law and would not be abused.”

She raised several questions over the purported changes the Minnis administration made to the bill first introduced by the former Christie administration, and implored the Minnis administration to address, in Parliament, all the concerns surrounding the troubled legislation.

“I don’t recall this being in the prior legislation,” Mrs Hanna-Martin said, “because what you are doing now is putting obligation on a postal worker to co-operate with a law enforcement agency to intercept a communication, whether they want to or not.”

Mr Saunders responded: “Englerston, member for Englerston, I am not in any way trying to circumvent you from asking the question. I am just putting members on notice that this isn’t going to be an opportunity for us to go to great lengths to debate. But I do get your point.”

He continued: “For example, in Trinidad, the Commissioner of Police, he has to file a report annually with respect to these matters. Then that report is made public. It doesn’t identify, it doesn’t detail the names of the persons, but at least you understand what is going on.

“In Jamaica, they have a similar act. By practice, not as I am aware by any permission of the law, they file, they lay in Parliament a report on how the act is being administered. And this also informs whether or not any provisions of the act is required to be amended as we go on. It is restricted just to events and what is happening.”

Following Mr Davis’ point, Mrs Hanna Martin added: “I think that it should be a matter of practice, but it should be enshrined in the law because there should be checks and balances in it. I do not want to give carte blanche to any the discretion of a private entity or an agency and there is no protection for the individual.”

“I am not sure how it happens in other jurisdictions with the information, you listen to hours and hours and hours of someone’s conversations and then you leave it to the discretion of the officer to redact or to reserve exculpatory (information).

“[Dr Minnis] supported the bill now and his support of the bill is at odds with what he had to say about it in the past. They dubbed it a spy bill. The bill is a necessary tool in the fight against crime. As prime minister, at least speak of policy and give some assurance to the citizens at large that the execution would be done in accordance with law and would not be abused.”

She raised several questions over the purported changes the Minnis administration made to the bill first introduced by the former Christie administration, and implored the Minnis administration to address, in Parliament, all the concerns surrounding the troubled legislation.

“I don’t recall this being in the prior legislation,” Mrs Hanna-Martin said, “because what you are doing now is putting obligation on a postal worker to co-operate with a law enforcement agency to intercept a communication, whether they want to or not.”

Mr Saunders responded: “Englerston, member for Englerston, I am not in any way trying to circumvent you from asking the question. I am just putting members on notice that this isn’t going to be an opportunity for us to go to great lengths to debate. But I do get your point.”

He continued: “For example, in Trinidad, the Commissioner of Police, he has to file a report annually with respect to these matters. Then that report is made public. It doesn’t identify, it doesn’t detail the names of the persons, but at least you understand what is going on.

“In Jamaica, they have a similar act. By practice, not as I am aware by any permission of the law, they file, they lay in Parliament a report on how the act is being administered. And this also informs whether or not any provisions of the act is required to be amended as we go on. It is restricted just to events and what is happening.”

Following Mr Davis’ point, Mrs Hanna Martin added: “I think that it should be a matter of practice, but it should be enshrined in the law because there should be checks and balances in it. I do not want to give carte blanche to any the discretion of a private entity or an agency and there is no protection for the individual.”

“I am not sure how it happens in other jurisdictions with the information, you listen to hours and hours and hours of someone’s conversations and then you leave it to the discretion of the officer to redact or to reserve exculpatory (information).