Pnc bank, garden state arts center 50th anniversary music, drama and memories gasset y ortega filosofia

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Rock ’n’ roll music slowly started taking over more of the arts center dates in the first two decades. Jackson Browne partly recorded his live album “Running on Empty” there in 1977. The album is also a chapter in the pre-Live Nation era of the arts center, a moment when decidedly unhip acts like Steve and Eydie Gorme and Glen Campbell (who, incidentally, recorded a live album there in 1969), made way for Browne’s rock ’n’ roll.

“The Road,” a gentle acoustic ballad, and the driving rocker, “You Love the Thunder,” were recorded at the arts center during two September performances. The gamboling “Nothing but Time” was recorded on the band’s tour bus on the roads of Jersey.

When the arts center was built in ’68, there was a handful of amphitheaters dotting the county, built primarily by local symphonies or the local municipalities. Heading into the ’80s, the concert industry started repositioning itself to emphasize summer concerts, and that meant the beginning of a boom era for amphitheaters, which we are still in.

“Little by little, the taste of the public went towards rock ’n’ roll, and now rock ’n’ roll is here to stay,” said esteemed Jersey music promoter John Scher. “More amphitheaters were built across the country and they started getting bigger shows and the acts started gearing their shows toward bigger capacity venues.”

The venue was swept up in the wave of privatization under the administration of Gov. Christine Todd Whitman in the ’90s. The naming rights were sold to PNC Bank and the operation of the venue was leased to GSAC Partners, an entity that eventually became Live Nation, in 1996.

Rock ’n’ roll music slowly started taking over more of the arts center dates in the first two decades. Jackson Browne partly recorded his live album “Running on Empty” there in 1977. The album is also a chapter in the pre-Live Nation era of the arts center, a moment when decidedly unhip acts like Steve and Eydie Gorme and Glen Campbell (who, incidentally, recorded a live album there in 1969), made way for Browne’s rock ’n’ roll.

“The Road,” a gentle acoustic ballad, and the driving rocker, “You Love the Thunder,” were recorded at the arts center during two September performances. The gamboling “Nothing but Time” was recorded on the band’s tour bus on the roads of Jersey.

When the arts center was built in ’68, there was a handful of amphitheaters dotting the county, built primarily by local symphonies or the local municipalities. Heading into the ’80s, the concert industry started repositioning itself to emphasize summer concerts, and that meant the beginning of a boom era for amphitheaters, which we are still in.

“Little by little, the taste of the public went towards rock ’n’ roll, and now rock ’n’ roll is here to stay,” said esteemed Jersey music promoter John Scher. “More amphitheaters were built across the country and they started getting bigger shows and the acts started gearing their shows toward bigger capacity venues.”

The venue was swept up in the wave of privatization under the administration of Gov. Christine Todd Whitman in the ’90s. The naming rights were sold to PNC Bank and the operation of the venue was leased to GSAC Partners, an entity that eventually became Live Nation, in 1996.