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Click to expand…You use the term "pandering sycophant" in reference to my comments regarding the statements of foreign leaders with respect to Trump. It would be more accurate to describe that relationship as the wise utilization of what is clearly an accurate assessment of Trump’s psychological profile.

"This is beyond narcissism. I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully. I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him. Most politicians seek approval. But Trump lives for the adoration. He doesn’t even try to hide it, boasting incessantly about his crowds, his standing ovations, his TV ratings, his poll numbers, his primary victories. The latter are most prized because they offer empirical evidence of how loved and admired he is."

From 1975 through 1978 Krauthammer was a resident in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, serving as chief resident his final year. During his time as chief resident he noted a variant of manic depression (bipolar disorder) that he identified and named "Secondary Mania." He published his findings in the Archives of General Psychiatry. [9] He also coauthored a path-finding study on the epidemiology of mania. [10]

You use the term "pandering sycophant" in reference to my comments regarding the statements of foreign leaders with respect to Trump. It would be more accurate to describe that relationship as the wise utilization of what is clearly an accurate assessment of Trump’s psychological profile.

"This is beyond narcissism. I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully. I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him. Most politicians seek approval. But Trump lives for the adoration. He doesn’t even try to hide it, boasting incessantly about his crowds, his standing ovations, his TV ratings, his poll numbers, his primary victories. The latter are most prized because they offer empirical evidence of how loved and admired he is."

From 1975 through 1978 Krauthammer was a resident in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, serving as chief resident his final year. During his time as chief resident he noted a variant of manic depression (bipolar disorder) that he identified and named "Secondary Mania." He published his findings in the Archives of General Psychiatry. [9] He also coauthored a path-finding study on the epidemiology of mania. [10]

You use the term "pandering sycophant" in reference to my comments regarding the statements of foreign leaders with respect to Trump. It would be more accurate to describe that relationship as the wise utilization of what is clearly an accurate assessment of Trump’s psychological profile.

"This is beyond narcissism. I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully. I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him. Most politicians seek approval. But Trump lives for the adoration. He doesn’t even try to hide it, boasting incessantly about his crowds, his standing ovations, his TV ratings, his poll numbers, his primary victories. The latter are most prized because they offer empirical evidence of how loved and admired he is."

From 1975 through 1978 Krauthammer was a resident in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, serving as chief resident his final year. During his time as chief resident he noted a variant of manic depression (bipolar disorder) that he identified and named "Secondary Mania." He published his findings in the Archives of General Psychiatry. [9] He also coauthored a path-finding study on the epidemiology of mania. [10]