Pop culture wi venus instead of mars page 2 alternate history discussion electricity videos for students

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In popular imagination of the sci-fi and speculative fiction variety, Mars is seen as the natural destiny of humanity. To explore, to settle, the possibly find aliens there (or at least, the vestiges of their dead civilizations). Venus has been overshadowed ever since the realization that the entire planet is a ball of Add to dictionary acid and the surface much more difficult to walk upon. But Venus used to be well-known in myth and pop culture, what with being the twin of Earth, the Morning Star, covered in jungles, etc. etc. Apparently Edgar Rice Burroughs has a Carson of Venus series! Some cool stuff here.

I think I first encountered the idea of exploration of Venus in Beer’s Revolution, Maple astrid y gaston lima reservations Leafs, Chrysanthemes and the Eagle -A revised 1848 TL. Since then, I’ve found that there’s been proposals to send an expedition and even colonize Venus before Mars. For one thing, Venus is closer to Earth than Mars is, and its gravity is the same, thus preventing the negative effects on the human body of living in a 1G environment. Charles Stross makes a pretty interesting case here. Here’s a summary article.

Click to expand…Heh, rehabilitating Venus as a Human destination? (Stole that from here: http://moonsociety.org/publications/mmm_papers/venus_rehabpaper.htm, and http://www.moonsociety.org/publications/mmm_themes/mmmt_solarsystem.pdf ) You have already run into the main ‘issues’ with doing so; Most people think Venus is hell and that it’s either to hard to get to, impossible to ‘live’ on, or you can’t get back once you’ve gone. All of which makes getting it as ‘popular’ destination almost impossible gas in babies treatment despite valid and logical arguments to the contrary. You’ll note the assumptions given here

Pop-culture wise, well I have a lot of notes and stuff for an RPG/adventure game campaign called Sky Pirates of Venus! which takes everything people loved about 20s-and-30s ‘aero-punk’ like Crimson Skies and Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow and gives it a light covering of science fiction and credibility in the works But the disappointment that it wasn’t a swamp-covered world of dinosaurs and naked-cave women seems to have been something humans generally haven’t been able to get over. It doesn’t help that when people think of Lighter-Than-Air the Hindenburg and other airship disasters is what generally comes to mind.

Part of the ‘problem’ seems to be one of perception in any case as neither Mercury or Venus get much attention for electricity projects for class 12 what seems to be not much more than the fact they are ‘inward’ from the sun and not ‘outward’ from it like Mars. As most of the ‘arguments’ for going to and colonizing Mars are applicable to Venus the actual ‘justification’ is of course there but the main argument which boils down to we’ve ‘landed’ and survived longer on Mars than we have on Venus, (see land-bias’ above) will not be resolved until we actually have ‘done’ a Venus long-term atmosphere probe.

(I’d originally come up with an idea I called Green Dragon before someone else started using it as the basis for an orbital greenhouse project and lately someone else has come up with the same idea but better PR Anyway a Dragon capsule with suspended from a balloon deployed from the docking port and filled with science and measurement instruments is quite a do-able concept if anyone were interested)

Click to expand…You already have reusable spacecraft on Earth so doing the same on Venus is a snap. The thicker atmosphere is actually a bonus as you can use if for lift and for propulsion where as you can’t on Mars. In another example of popular culture/knowledge being opposite of the facts combining standard ramjets, (not Supersonic combustion ramjets which are still not operational but standard subsonic combustion ramjets which everyone in the world can build using 1950s technology and which were operated by almost every gas knife lamb nation in the world at one point or another) can be flow up to speeds between Mach-6 to 8 at which point you want to leave the atmosphere anyway due to heating. Combine them with internal rockets, (proven electricity flow chart technology we had in the 1960s called a Supercharged Ejector Ramjet Engine or SERJ) and you have a viable Single Stage to Orbit vehicle. Heck we’ve shown you could have a pure rocket powered SSTO spaceplane if you use cryogenic propellants. Liquid Hydrogen and LOX works best but Liquid Methane/LOX is just about as good. Two stage to orbit is better though and operationally a lifter stage would make more sense than launching directly from your aerostat habitat. (I call them Habi-stats ) The lifter would be a hybrid semi-lifting body shape with some static lift that would transport the upper stage to high altitude before letting it go into orbit.

Alternatively, Matt the czar points out to HASTOL and the skyhook concept ( https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo…he-cosmos-in-the-twenty-first-century.409216/, http://www.niac.usra.edu/files/studies/final_report/391Grant.pdf, http://www.tethers.com/papers/JPC00HASTOL.pdf, https://www.scribd.com/document/238566144/HASTOL) and frankly I’d be surprised if someone doesn’t make EXACTLY gas unlimited the pitch Matt talks about at some point

Venus has a lot of water as well but it’s mostly bound up in the atmosphere rather than in the soil. Scooping air and gathering water isn’t as hard as mining or drilling for it just a lot more tedious. More CO2 to convert to propellant with the thicker atmosphere as well. Red Dragon can not in fact take off from Mars to orbit btw, it can LAND but not take off again without a booster so it’s not a valid comparison. A better comparison is a Falcon-9 first stage and payload section.

VTOL is overrated with a good atmosphere to work with. You don’t have a choice on Mars as it’s the only way to do it. It’s nice on Earth for some uses but it requires the engines and guidance work EVERY time whereas wings or lifting is much more forgiving. More so on Venus. Also the air you breath (O2/nitrogen) is a lifting gas on Venus gas oil ratio for leaf blower almost as good as Helium on Earth is so you can actually live in part of your airship along with a nice thick atmosphere to shield you from radiation which you get on Mars only by burying your habitat.

In popular imagination of the sci-fi and speculative fiction variety, Mars is seen as the natural destiny of humanity. To explore, to settle, the possibly find aliens there (or at least, the vestiges of their dead civilizations). Venus has been overshadowed ever since the realization that the entire planet is a ball of sulphuric acid and the surface much more difficult to walk upon. But Venus used to be well-known in myth and pop culture, what with being the twin of Earth, the Morning Star, covered in jungles, etc. etc. Apparently Edgar Rice Burroughs has a Carson of Venus series! Some cool stuff here.

I think I first encountered the idea of exploration of Venus in Beer’s Revolution, Maple Leafs, Chrysanthemes and the Eagle -A revised 1848 TL. Since then, I’ve found that there’s been proposals to send an expedition and even colonize Venus before Mars. For one thing, Venus is closer to Earth than Mars is, and its gravity is the same, thus preventing the negative effects on the human body of living in a 1G environment. Charles Stross makes a pretty interesting case here. Here’s a summary article.

The Titan-II missile first stage was capable of SSTO but would only carry a few hundred pounds and that had a very wicked final acceleration and probable aerodynamic issues. The Saturn S-IVB was capable of SSTO operations as was the Shuttle ET using SSMEs for propulsion but again the actual payload wasn’t significant enough to warrant doing so. (See: http://www.spacefuture.com/archive/a_single_stage_to_orbit_thought_experiment.shtml) And again no reusability since that would wipe grade 6 electricity project out what payload they did have.

As I pointed out multi-stage, (preferably Two Stage or Stage-and-A-Half) designs are more efficient and if you insist on not using lift as per the Falcon series you can STILL recover your stages after flight to orbit. On Venus they will ‘float’ in the atmosphere ( http://selenianboondocks.com/2013/11/venusian-rocket-floaties/) You can even use ‘vertical’ landing craft like the Red Dragon (Green Dragon in this case, yes it’s funny but Venus is the green planet while Earth is the blue one go figure ) by popping a balloon instead of parachutes. Deploy some solar cells and electric fans and cruise to the nearest Habi-Stat for recovery and reuse.

Doing the ‘tourist’ thing as suggested you spend a bit over 21 months away from Earth in total while enjoying three weeks cavorting around the clouds of Venus and two months on Mars as pointed out in the Venus links above. Do you need infrastructure and established bases on Venus for this? Yes but you also need them on Mars because a tourist is NOT an explorer, they expect and will electricity and magnetism worksheets middle school demand some basic accommodations and support. Not ones that are actually paying for the trip rather than paying a small portion of the total cost for the prestige. (And not if you’re making a profit along the way) Yes you have to deliver the basic infrastructure to Venus and deploy it. You have to do the same to Mars and it’s NOT that much different when you get down to details. And as always the devil is in those details. If you don’t automatically assume that they ARE vastly different, (mostly because people assume that you have to be on the ‘surface’ in both cases and so artificially stack the deck against Venus or inflate the easy of going to Mars which is the premise of the thread ) details and you don’t assume that the choice is binary, (either/or which again is an assumption based on the idea the you can ONLY do one or the other) the choice is a lot less clear gas tax in ct cut than commonly thought.