Power ratings and speakers. can you explain this one page 2 audioholics home theater forums z gas ensenada

The first sentence is excellent leading into hopefully more, but unfortunately they added their own misnomer in the second sentence that will likely result in further confusions. It also appeared to be contradictory to what Yepi quoted, that is, pink noise vs single tone.

"When I refer to power in any of my articles, common usage shall prevail, and I (like many others in audio) will reluctantly accept the term RMS Power to mean power. All amplifier power ratings in the project pages (and elsewhere) are ‘RMS’ unless otherwise stated."

So if Rod Elliot and supposedly Gene, could reluctantly accept that, so could I, but I take issue with the word "technically, and "continuous". Klipsch has a large customer base, they shouldn’t have made things worse and now we can expect when people see the so called RMS power rating of other speakers (not by Klipsch) they might be led to believe those are literally "continuous" power ratings.

Even for Klipsch speakers, they could do even better if in addition to what yepimonfire quoted, by also providing the type (is it really pink noise, or a sine wave?) and duration of the applied test signal. Without the duration, say 1 second, 2 minutes…etc., are we to interpret that as literally continuous (like forever),one cycle of a sine wave at 1 kHz, or 50 ms using a pink noise tone, what is it anyway?? Again, to be fair, the information Klipsch has provided on the power ratings of their speakers over the years are plenty, compared that of many if not most of their competitors.

The first sentence is excellent leading into hopefully more, but unfortunately they added their own misnomer in the second sentence that will likely result in further confusions. It also appeared to be contradictory to what Yepi quoted, that is, pink noise vs single tone.

"When I refer to power in any of my articles, common usage shall prevail, and I (like many others in audio) will reluctantly accept the term RMS Power to mean power. All amplifier power ratings in the project pages (and elsewhere) are ‘RMS’ unless otherwise stated."

So if Rod Elliot and supposedly Gene, could reluctantly accept that, so could I, but I take issue with the word "technically, and "continuous". Klipsch has a large customer base, they shouldn’t have made things worse and now we can expect when people see the so called RMS power rating of other speakers (not by Klipsch) they might be led to believe those are literally "continuous" power ratings.

Even for Klipsch speakers, they could do even better if in addition to what yepimonfire quoted, by also providing the type (is it really pink noise, or a sine wave?) and duration of the applied test signal. Without the duration, say 1 second, 2 minutes…etc., are we to interpret that as literally continuous (like forever),one cycle of a sine wave at 1 kHz, or 50 ms using a pink noise tone, what is it anyway?? Again, to be fair, the information Klipsch has provided on the power ratings of their speakers over the years are plenty, compared that of many if not most of their competitors.

Click to expand…I did, you, "SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES" if you put more than 100 watts into the speaker! I have read the articles here on audioholics.com and have learned a good bit. Since joining the forum, I’ve bought an SPL, calibrated my speakers to reference level, and leaned a lot about audio brands that I never knew existed. I totally understand why you don’t like the term RMS on the forums. For my purposes, I’m going to think about RMS like the article said, " The importance of RMS voltage and current are that they can be directly used to calculate the average power."

Random side note this article go me thinking about ham radio. That’s how my interest in audio began a long time. As a kid my dad was always really into ham radio. I saw that he had bought a $120 tube for his ham radio amplifier recently. I asked him, so you like tube amplifiers better than solid-state amplifiers? He told me that solid-state amplifier are the way to go in ham radio but cost about $5000 new. Also, I remember long time ago helping them properly grounded his antenna. We had to get these 20 foot copper rod’s and get them deep into the ground. I learned a lot about grounding on that project. LOL I’ve always found it interesting how stuff works but I think I learn better when I actually see it and do it. + I’m never been the best at math either so that doesn’t help

Click to expand…A typical room has its own unique acoustic footprint made up of various dips, peaks, nodes of frequency response.. So the listening room’s footprint summed with the loudspeaker’s frequency response is what the listener will hear. For example, the shape of the room vs loudspeaker placement, wall/floor materials hard and reflective or soft and absorbent.. In our years of experience doing home & commercial AV system installs we have often measured frequency peaks & nodes as much as +/-15dB. Often the listener thinks that running a Room EQ scheme such as Audyssey will smooth these out but in certain cases the EQ software reduces the available headroom within the DSP processor.. So in the end the listener trades off EQ correction for signal headroom..

Another example, if one is running certain Klipsch loudspeakers that utilize a horn tweeter this can tend to sound peaky with too much treble boosted high frequencies.. But if the room has drapes and carpeting this can tend to absorb and dampen the high frequencies..

A typical room has its own unique acoustic footprint made up of various dips, peaks, nodes of frequency response.. So the listening room’s footprint summed with the loudspeaker’s frequency response is what the listener will hear. For example, the shape of the room vs loudspeaker placement, wall/floor materials hard and reflective or soft and absorbent.. In our years of experience doing home & commercial AV system installs we have often measured frequency peaks & nodes as much as +/-15dB. Often the listener thinks that running a Room EQ scheme such as Audyssey will smooth these out but in certain cases the EQ software reduces the available headroom within the DSP processor.. So in the end the listener trades off EQ correction for signal headroom..

Another example, if one is running certain Klipsch loudspeakers that utilize a horn tweeter this can tend to sound peaky with too much treble boosted high frequencies.. But if the room has drapes and carpeting this can tend to absorb and dampen the high frequencies..