Product management weekly tips gas jokes

– The product management role is broad at the top. Just by looking at titles, it may seem like every product manager does the same thing, but there’s actually more than one type of product manager in the tech world. Let’s talk about three common types, consumer, internal, and B2B or Business-To-Business. The big difference in these roles is in the stakeholders, which is just a fancy term for people who have input into what you’re building. Examples of stakeholders are your users, executives, and other teams like legal, sales, and marketing.

Let’s start with the consumer product manager, sometimes referred to as a B2C product manager. As the name implies, these are the folks who build products for the everyday consumer out there. Examples might be people who work at Twitter, Google, Instagram, Facebook, et cetera. Since the primary stakeholder for a consumer product manager is usually thousands of users in the general public, these PM roles are usually very focused on the creative side of things as well as vision. Think about it. Since there’s thousands or millions of users out there, it’s not completely clear what exactly needs to be built next.

For that reason, there’s a lot of time spent talking to users, testing with prototypes, and analyzing tons of user data. Their goal is to maximize usage, engagement, or some other user-facing metric that ends up making the company more profitable. Now how about the internal product manager? Sometimes part of a team called internal tools or similar, these product managers and their teams are focused on building tools or systems for other people within their own organization, thus the name internal. Since their primary stakeholders, the users, are inside the organization, these PMs are typically more focused on execution and making their co-workers as productive as possible.

An example of an internal PM would be one that leads development on a feature that the customer support team can use to help users do something easy like reset their password. Lastly, the B2B product manager role. Commonly found working at Software as a Service or SaaS companies, these product managers lead development on products whose user is someone at another company. This role differs from the other two because it’s very common for companies to buy products they use through salespeople. Knowing this, it makes sense that the sales teams at their own companies would be a big stakeholder for these PMs as well as the end users at those companies that they sell to.

Keep in mind, however, that many companies selling to other businesses these days have adopted a self-purchase model that avoids the use of sales teams. In these cases, the B2B product manager-stakeholder interactions would shift more towards those end users and away from sales people in their own organization. So there we have it, three types of product managers. When thinking about different PM roles, remember that the differences in the roles are in the stakeholders that they serve. Consumer PM focuses on the external public users. Internal ones focus on people within their own org and B2B product managers focus on the end purchaser of their product through the sales team or the business users themselves.

– The product management role is broad at the top. Just by looking at titles, it may seem like every product manager does the same thing, but there’s actually more than one type of product manager in the tech world. Let’s talk about three common types, consumer, internal, and B2B or Business-To-Business. The big difference in these roles is in the stakeholders, which is just a fancy term for people who have input into what you’re building. Examples of stakeholders are your users, executives, and other teams like legal, sales, and marketing.

Let’s start with the consumer product manager, sometimes referred to as a B2C product manager. As the name implies, these are the folks who build products for the everyday consumer out there. Examples might be people who work at Twitter, Google, Instagram, Facebook, et cetera. Since the primary stakeholder for a consumer product manager is usually thousands of users in the general public, these PM roles are usually very focused on the creative side of things as well as vision. Think about it. Since there’s thousands or millions of users out there, it’s not completely clear what exactly needs to be built next.

For that reason, there’s a lot of time spent talking to users, testing with prototypes, and analyzing tons of user data. Their goal is to maximize usage, engagement, or some other user-facing metric that ends up making the company more profitable. Now how about the internal product manager? Sometimes part of a team called internal tools or similar, these product managers and their teams are focused on building tools or systems for other people within their own organization, thus the name internal. Since their primary stakeholders, the users, are inside the organization, these PMs are typically more focused on execution and making their co-workers as productive as possible.

An example of an internal PM would be one that leads development on a feature that the customer support team can use to help users do something easy like reset their password. Lastly, the B2B product manager role. Commonly found working at Software as a Service or SaaS companies, these product managers lead development on products whose user is someone at another company. This role differs from the other two because it’s very common for companies to buy products they use through salespeople. Knowing this, it makes sense that the sales teams at their own companies would be a big stakeholder for these PMs as well as the end users at those companies that they sell to.

Keep in mind, however, that many companies selling to other businesses these days have adopted a self-purchase model that avoids the use of sales teams. In these cases, the B2B product manager-stakeholder interactions would shift more towards those end users and away from sales people in their own organization. So there we have it, three types of product managers. When thinking about different PM roles, remember that the differences in the roles are in the stakeholders that they serve. Consumer PM focuses on the external public users. Internal ones focus on people within their own org and B2B product managers focus on the end purchaser of their product through the sales team or the business users themselves.