Qantas recruitment – page 110 – pprune forums i have electricity in my body

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I actually fly this PER-LHR sector. I’ve tried lots of different options including coming over the day before. For this particular sector, which departs all 4 gas giants names early evening, it works best, for me, to spend a night in my own bed. Get up when I wake up, catch the early afternoon flight to Perth, have a couple of hours to iron a shirt and grab a bite to eat, then go to work. I don’t care if I have the first break, or second. It doesn’t matter as I either have first break and doze, or second break and have a solid four hour sleep. I actually find that I’m arriving in London ready to start the day. I don’t even feel like I need to sleep immediately after getting to the hotel.

What seems to escape some people is that this aircraft flies for 18 hours before arriving in London. You should plan to rest on board. Get a solid four hours sleep in the crew rest and I feel I’m arriving in London relatively fresh. The mindset here is that people should be as fresh as they would be when your average office worker arrives at there desk at 9am after 9 hours sleep in their own bed. This is not possible when your flying back of the clock. What office worker spends 18 solid hours at their desk without sleep? If they do then they gas zone edenvale’d be in absolutely no state to drive home, let alone land an aeroplane. Add to that a back of the clock roster and it’s imperative that you plan a sleep on board. The best way to achieve that is to plan to sleep, as best power outage houston zip code you can, when your body clock wants you to sleep. That means being ready to sleep 4-8 hours into this 18 hour sector. By flying over on the day of the flight I find I can achieve this. Fly over on the day before and I can’t. I’d be more than happy explaining this to “His Honour”.

Some airlines, Emirates is one, have an operating crew and a relief crew. The relief crew are actually encouraged to turn up tired. They are expected to take the first break so it would be pointless turning up fresh as a daisy and not be able to sleep. Qantas has Second Officers so this won’t work. So some latitude must be allowed to achieve your own balance.

I guess the takeout from this is that crew rest is individual. What works for some, might not work for others. By taking BAs cookie cutter approach by banning staff travel on the day of operating would actually make matters a lot more stressful for everyone, especially those who z gas tecate find paxing on the day works best for them. The best way is undoubtedly what Qantas presently does. Leave it up to the individual to make up their own mind on what works best for them. Unfortunately, rules will probably be forced upon us because desk bound self appointed experts think they know better.Out of curiosity, how do the rest periods run on board? One at a time, SO/CPT at the same time ect

I actually fly this PER-LHR sector. I’ve tried lots of different options including coming over the electricity bill average day before. For this particular sector, which departs early evening, it works best, for me, to spend a night in my own bed. Get up when I wake up, catch the early afternoon flight to Perth, have a couple of hours to iron a shirt and grab a bite to eat, then go to work. I don’t care if I have the first break, or second. It doesn’t matter as I either have first break and doze, or second break and have a solid four hour sleep. I actually find that I’m arriving in London ready to start the day. I don’t even feel like I need to sleep immediately after getting to the hotel.

What seems to escape some people is that this aircraft flies for 18 hours before arriving in London. You should plan to rest on board. Get a solid four hours sleep in the crew rest and I feel I’m arriving in London static electricity definition science relatively fresh. The mindset here is that people should be as fresh as they would be when your average office worker arrives at there desk at 9am after 9 hours sleep in their own bed. This is not possible when your flying back of the clock. What office worker spends 18 solid hours at their desk without sleep? If they do then they’d be in absolutely no state to drive home, let alone land an aeroplane. Add to that a back of the clock roster and it’s imperative that you plan a sleep on board. The best way to achieve that is to plan to sleep, as best you can, when your body clock wants you to sleep. That means being ready to sleep 4-8 hours into this 18 hour sector. By flying over on the day electricity billy elliot lyrics of the flight I find I can achieve this. Fly over on the day before and I can’t. I’d be more than happy explaining this to “His Honour”.

Some airlines, Emirates is one, have an operating crew and a relief crew. The relief crew are actually encouraged to turn up tired. They are expected to take the first break so it would be pointless turning up fresh as a daisy and not be able to sleep. Qantas has Second Officers so this won’t work. So some latitude must be allowed to achieve your own balance.

I guess the takeout from this is that crew rest is individual. What works for some, might not work for others. By taking BAs cookie cutter approach by banning staff travel on the day of operating would actually make matters a lot more stressful for everyone, especially those who find paxing on the day works best for them. The best way is undoubtedly what Qantas presently does. Leave it up to the individual to make up their own mind on what works best for them. Unfortunately, rules will probably be forced upon us because desk bound self appointed experts think they know better.Whether it suits your company or not is immaterial. That it works for you is great, however leaving aside the practicality o gastronomo have you considered how the court gas monkey monster truck hellcat would view it?

British Airways are not banning leisure travel on the day of operation to be petty. They have likely acted in response to the perceived shared legal responsibility for adequate rest before flight. In other words they probably recognise the potential for liability in the event of an accident and the court deciding a pilot involved was consented to commute on day of operations.

British Airways are not banning leisure travel on the day of operation to be petty. They have likely acted in response to the perceived shared legal responsibility for adequate rest before flight. In other words they probably recognise the potential for liability in the event of an accident and the court deciding a pilot involved was consented to commute on day of operations.

Despite your concerns, I don’t believe Qantas would have any issues either. They recognise the irrefutable fact that fatigue is a very personal thing. What works for one person, doesn’t work for someone else gas and bloating pain. To stringently legislate a set of protocols to cover commuting would actually adversely affect those, like me, who find the paxing on the day option results in less fatigue on arrival in London. By legislating a tight set of protocols as BA have done may actually open them up to liability rather than protect them from it. You can’t legislate out fatigue. A pilot in an incident could say that he was forced to operate in a method dictated by BAs restrictions which was sub optimal for him personally. Accordingly, your honour, I was actually more fatigued due to BAs restrictions than I would be if given the latitude to commute when it suited me.

The Colgan Air accident highlighted the fatigue issues relating to commuting before operating electricity origin and is often trotted out to justify the position of the armchair critics such as yourself. There is a world of difference between commuting across the country and then operating a 2 pilot 4 sector domestic day, and paxing to operate a 4 pilot single sector day with 8 hours rest in the bunk en route. A 2 pilot 4 sector domestic day is tiring even without commuting. I would never consider paxing across the country immediately prior to operating this duty day. A single sector 4 pilot duty is totally different, and requires a different approach.