Renault 8 and 10 – wikipedia la gasolina in english

The R8 (model R1130) was released in June 1962 [2] and was based on the Renault Dauphine with which it shared its basic architecture and its 2,270 mm (89.4 in) wheelbase. The style, closely following that of the first prototype produced, at unusually short notice, by Philippe Charbonneaux, was fashionably boxy; however, [2] while the Renault 8 was actually 30 mm (1.2 in) narrower than the Dauphine, the manufacturer was able to install thick cushioned front seats that were actually each 60 mm (2.4 in) wider, at 560 mm (22.0 in), than those fitted in the Dauphine. [2] The R8’s engine followed the pioneering example of the recently introduced Renault 4 by incorporating a sealed for life cooling system. [2] A distinctive innovation on the French produced cars was the fitting of four-wheel disc brakes, a first for a saloon car of this size. [2] However, when in 1965 Renault‘s Spanish affiliate [5] introduced their own version of the Renault 8 for the (then tariff-shielded) Spanish market, it came with drum brakes.

For 1963 (initially only in France), Renault offered an automatic transmission of unique design, developed and produced by Jaeger. [6] It was first shown at the September 1962 Paris Motor Show. [7] Although it was described as a form of automatic transmission at the time, in retrospect it was more realistically a form of automatic clutch, inspired by the German Saxomat device which appeared as an option on several mainstream German cars in the 1950s and 60s.

The clutch in the system was replaced by a powder ferromagnetic coupler, developed from a Smiths design. [7] The transmission itself was a three-speed mechanical unit similar to that of the Dauphine, but from the beginning with synchromesh on all gears in this version.

A "relay case" containing electromagnetic switches received signals from the governor and push buttons and then controlled a coupler, a decelerator to close the throttle during gear changes, and a solenoid to select operation of the reverse-first or second-third shift rail, using a reversible electric motor to engage the gears. The system was thus entirely electromechanical, without hydraulics, pneumatics or electronics.

A more powerful model, the 8 Major (model R1132), was released in 1964, featuring an 1108 cc engine developing 50 PS (37 kW; 49 hp). A still more powerful version, the 8 model R1134 Gordini, was also released that year, with a tuned engine of the same capacity but developing 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp). The extra power was obtained by a cross-flow head and twin dual-choke 40mm side-draft Solex carburetors. A four-speed close ratio manual transmission, dual rear shock absorbers and uprated springs were fitted. The R1134 Gordini was originally available only in blue, with two stick-on white stripes. It was also distinguishable from the 8 Major by the bigger 200mm headlamp units. In 1965, the Renault 10 Major, a more luxurious version of the 8 with different front and rear styling, was released, replacing the 8 Major. Facelift [ edit ]

In 1967, the R8 Gordini (model R1135) received a facelift including two additional headlights (in effect Cibie Oscar driving lights), and its engine upgraded to a 1255cc unit rated at 100 PS (74 kW; 99 hp). The R1134 Gordini cross-flow head design was retained, and twin dual-choke 40mm Weber side-draft carburetors. Both the 8 and the 10 were heavily revised for 1969. Some of the 10’s features being incorporated in the 8, resulting in a new 8 Major which replaced the basic model. The changes also saw the addition of the 8S, a sportier model with a 1108cc engine rated at 60 PS (44 kW; 59 hp). 8S model also had the same twin headlights as the R1135 Gordini – the middle ones were for high beam only. The car was delivered with black "RENAULT 8S" tapes, intended for the rear wings but their fixing was left to the customer. Also, the Romanian sport version was named Dacia 1100 S. [8] [9] European Rally victories [ edit ]

In September 1965 the Renault 10 Major (branded in some markets as the Renault 1100) was launched, replacing the Renault 8 Major. This was a lengthened version of the Renault 8 with an increased front overhang and a much enlarged front luggage compartment, its capacity increased from 240 to 315 litres. The dimensions of the central passenger cabin were unchanged, however. The 1,108 cc engine, which for some markets had already appeared in top of the range versions of the Renault 8, came from the Renault Caravelle. In the French market the Renault 10 found itself struggling to compete with the successful Peugeot 204 introduced in the same year. In the United States the Renault 10 was offered as "The Renault for people who swore they would never buy another one." [10]

A larger unit, the 1289 cc engine from the new Renault 12, was fitted to the Renault 10 for the Motor Show in October 1970, giving birth to the Renault 10-1300. [12] Although the engine mounted at the back of the Renault 10-1300 was in most respects identical to that fitted at the front of the Renault 12, the unit in the older car was effectively detuned, with a lowered compression ratio and a listed maximum output of 52 PS (38 kW; 51 hp) SAE (48 PS (35 kW; 47 hp) DIN) whereas the unit in the Renault 12 was advertised as providing 60 PS (44 kW; 59 hp) SAE (54 PS (40 kW; 53 hp) DIN). [12] In effect this placed Renault in the bizarre position of offering two competing models in the same market category, but the older rear engined design came with a listed price 1,000 francs (approximately 10%) lower and a top speed of 135 km/h (84 mph) as against 145 km/h (90 mph) for the entry level Renault 12. [12] The 1108cc version of the engine was also offered for 1970, but now only when combined with the Jaeger "button operated" semi-automatic transmission which had been offered in earlier versions of the car since 1963. [12]

Although production of the Renault 10 ended in 1971, the 8 was still sold in France as late as 1973. FASA-Renault, the company’s Spanish arm, continued to produce models 8 and 8TS (similar to the French-built 8S) until 1976 for the Spanish market, and components for the 8S and 8TS assembled in Mexico. Outside Europe [ edit ] Alconi [ edit ]

• ^ a b "Autotest: Renault 10 (1,289 c.c.) Latest version of Renault’s rear-engined medium-small family saloon, with new longer-stroke four-cylinder engine. Lively performance, without fuss. Light controls, very efficient brakes. Directional stability poor in side winds, but cornering good. Quiet, comfortable and economical small car.". Autocar. 132. Vol. (nbr3855). 1 January 1970. pp. 6–10.

• ^ FASA-Renault was a partnership between Renault and Spain which produced cars for the Spanish market subject to government requirements for a high proportion of local content which meant, at this stage, that Spanish built Renaults were not considered suitable for other European markets. Things changed after the death of Francisco Franco when Spain joined the EEC and the Spanish auto-market was integrated into that of the rest of western Europe.

• ^ [{ https://alconi.blogspot.ca/2013/05/the-renault-alconi-kit-for-renaults.html See Shell S.A. Technical bulletin 43…Paragraph 6.. Renault Africa’s technical department and the partners in Alconi Developments…months of experimenting and testing came up with the Renault 8 Alconi.]