Researchers in various studies looking for participants – purdue university news electricity experiments for high school

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Researchers are looking for child welfare caseworkers employed in Central Indiana for a research study on caseworker perceptions of working with foster parents and foster children. The goal of the study is to understand caseworkers’ perceptions of behavioral and emotional adjustment for children in foster care who have regular contact with biological parents, as well as caseworker experiences working with foster parents on issues related to parent-child contact/visitation.

Researchers are looking for currently licensed foster parents in Central Indiana for a research study on foster parent perceptions of parent-child interactions for children in foster care ages 3-9 years of age. The goal of the study is to understand foster parents’ perceptions of behavioral and emotional adjustment for young children in foster care who have regular contact with biological parents.

Participants in this study must (1) be currently licensed foster gas estimator parents in the state of Indiana, (2) reside in Greater Lafayette, (3) be the current non-relative foster caregiver for a foster child ages 3-9 who regularly has contact with a biological parent electricity generation by country, and who will remain in the current foster placement for at least three weeks after the start of data collection.

Participants will complete two sessions. The first session will take about 40 minutes and will include online surveys, a prerequisite knowledge check, and a math test. One week later, participants will attend the second session, lasting approximately 10 minutes, for a knowledge check and math test. Participants will receive $16 for completion of both sessions.

Participation in the study involves one visit to the lab lasting approximately five to six hours. The lab visit may include web-based questionnaires, having brain activity recorded (EEG and/or MRI), having heart activity recorded, completing computer tasks that involve responding quickly to shapes and viewing emotional stimuli, and completing an interview about feelings and experiences. Participants will be paid $20 per hour.

Children will then participate in two brain-wave recording sessions, during which their brain activity to speech sounds will be collected. Brain-wave recording sessions are structured as games. Brain waves will be collected with the help of a special cap with built-in electrodes (similar to EEG recordings). There is no discomfort involved, and the method has been safely used with infants, children and adults.

To participate, children must be 8 to 12 years old; typically developing; right-handed native speakers of American English; free of speech, language, hearing/vision or neurological disorders and conditions such as autism/Asperger’s, head injuries, seizures, brain z gas ensenada tumors, cerebral palsy, ADHD, stuttering and depression; and should not be currently on medications that may affect brain activity (e.g., medications to control ADHD, seizures or depression).

The study involves one visit to the lab lasting up to three hours, during which you will be asked to complete several questionnaires and have your brain activity recorded (EEG) while completing several simple computer tasks. The tasks electricity distribution losses will involve responding quickly to shapes on the screen and viewing emotional stimuli. Participants will be paid $20 per hour, plus a possible monetary bonus on some of the tasks.

Participants will be asked to swallow small amounts of barium (used as a contrast) and glide their voice on vowels like this /ee/. They will be trained for both of these tasks. The barium will be used to visualize the swallow on a real-time X-ray, which is similar to common procedures like a chest X-ray. The study is approximately two and a half hours, and eligible participants will receive $20.

Testing sessions are conducted in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences in Lyles-Porter Hall, and can be scheduled at times convenient for the participants. For more information, contact Anumitha Venkatraman at 765-496-0207 or swallowinglab@purdue.edu. IRB#: 1809021037. Study examining performance on repeat trials of Boggle word game

This study is examining the common types of interpersonal situations people experience in the workplace, and how these situations affect people’s daily job attitudes and behaviors. For this study, participants will first come to the Purdue campus to complete study orientation and a preliminary survey (about one hour). Second, over a period of two business weeks (Monday-Friday), participants will use their smartphone to complete three short surveys per day (three to five minutes each) asking about current work situations and daily work attitudes and gas mask bong nfl behavior. Third, participants will be asked to complete an ending survey (about 20 minutes) using a link sent via email. Other than the study orientation, all parts of the study will be completed remotely.

Two-year-old children (2 years to 2 years and 11 months) are needed for a project exploring the relationship between cognitive and motor abilities in children. Many developmental disorders (e.g., autism, ADHD, developmental coordination disorder) are characterized by problems in both cognitive skills (e.g., problem-solving, working memory) and motor skills function (e.g., balancing, running). Researchers are investigating possible common central mechanisms involved in these two domains, in typically developing children. Findings from this research could lead to the development of intervention techniques such as motor skills training that will have the potential to improve cognitive skills in both special needs populations and typically developing z gas guatemala children.

If you would like your child to participate, you and your child are invited to visit the Life-Span Motor Development Lab at Purdue for a 1-hour and 15-minute session. Children will be asked to complete a few cognitive games (using their memory and problem-solving skills) and a few motor skills games (using their fine motor skills and balance abilities). For example, for one of the cognitive games, children will be asked to sort objects based on their size. For one of the motor games, children will be asked to build a tower out of blocks and, for another, children will stand on a device that measures their balance abilities. In addition, two questionnaires will gas vs electric stove safety need to be completed during the test session. Children will receive a small gift as a token of appreciation, and parents will receive $5 for completing the questionnaires.

Testing sessions are conducted in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences in Lyles-Porter Hall, and can be scheduled at times convenient for the participants. For more information, contact Samantha Mitchell at 765-496-0207 or swallowinglab@purdue.edu. IRB#: 1410015417. Engineering design and computer science sessions for children with high-functioning autism

The Aphasia Research Laboratory is currently recruiting persons with aphasia following a stroke who have no history of other neurological diseases and are native speakers of English. The study will take one to eight sessions, and each session will take approximately two hours. The study includes a comprehensive language evaluation and will take place at Purdue, the lab’s Indianapolis location or at the participant’s home.