Respiratory system organs and their functions new health advisor gas 69

The respiratory system plays a vital role in the body, by providing your cells with much needed oxygen, as well as excreting carbon dioxide, which can be deadly if allowed to accumulate. Major parts of the system include the airways, the lungs, and the muscles of respiration. This article will explain anatomy of the respiratory system, detailing the organs involved as well as the things that can go wrong. Anatomy of Respiratory System: Organs and Functions

The three major parts of the respiratory system all work together to carry out their task. The airways (nose, mouth, pharynx, larynx etc.) allow air to enter the body and into the lungs. The lungs work to pass oxygen into the body, whilst removing carbon dioxide from the body. The muscles of respiration, such as the diaphragm, work in unison to pump air into and out of the lungs whilst breathing.

Inhaling air through the mouth allows more inhalation, as the oral cavity is far larger than the nasal cavity. The air also has less distance to travel, meaning more air can enter your body and be used faster. The oral cavity has no hairs or filtering techniques, meaning the air you inhale does not undergo the filtration process.

Air that is inhaled enters the pharynx, where it descends into the larynx via a diversion from the epiglottis. As the pharynx is used for swallowing food as well as breathing, the epiglottis ensures that air can pass into the trachea, and that food enters the esophagus.

The main respiratory function of the trachea is to provide a clear and unhindered airway for air to enter and exit the lungs. Inside the trachea, small hairs reside upon the inner walls. These hairs catch dust and other contaminants from inhaled air, which are later expelled via coughing.

The diaphragm contracts to expand the space inside the thoracic cavity, whilst moving a few inches inferiorly into the abdominal cavity. Whilst this is happening, the intercostal muscles also contract, which moves the rip cage up and out. The contractions force air into the lungs, by creating a negative pressure through expansion.

Parts of the respiratory system and anatomy of respiratory system and organ functions cannot be complete if you don’t understand the transition between CO2 and O2. Once air has been inhaled, it passed through the airways until it reaches the alveoli within the lungs. Alveolus are surrounded by capillaries, through which the gasses enter and exit. Carbon dioxide enters the alveolus, where oxygen is extracted and passed back into the body. The constant blood flow prevents saturation of the blood, allowing for optimal transfer. The following picture better illustrates the process:

The respiratory system plays a vital role in the body, by providing your cells with much needed oxygen, as well as excreting carbon dioxide, which can be deadly if allowed to accumulate. Major parts of the system include the airways, the lungs, and the muscles of respiration. This article will explain anatomy of the respiratory system, detailing the organs involved as well as the things that can go wrong. Anatomy of Respiratory System: Organs and Functions

The three major parts of the respiratory system all work together to carry out their task. The airways (nose, mouth, pharynx, larynx etc.) allow air to enter the body and into the lungs. The lungs work to pass oxygen into the body, whilst removing carbon dioxide from the body. The muscles of respiration, such as the diaphragm, work in unison to pump air into and out of the lungs whilst breathing.

Inhaling air through the mouth allows more inhalation, as the oral cavity is far larger than the nasal cavity. The air also has less distance to travel, meaning more air can enter your body and be used faster. The oral cavity has no hairs or filtering techniques, meaning the air you inhale does not undergo the filtration process.

Air that is inhaled enters the pharynx, where it descends into the larynx via a diversion from the epiglottis. As the pharynx is used for swallowing food as well as breathing, the epiglottis ensures that air can pass into the trachea, and that food enters the esophagus.

The main respiratory function of the trachea is to provide a clear and unhindered airway for air to enter and exit the lungs. Inside the trachea, small hairs reside upon the inner walls. These hairs catch dust and other contaminants from inhaled air, which are later expelled via coughing.

The diaphragm contracts to expand the space inside the thoracic cavity, whilst moving a few inches inferiorly into the abdominal cavity. Whilst this is happening, the intercostal muscles also contract, which moves the rip cage up and out. The contractions force air into the lungs, by creating a negative pressure through expansion.

Parts of the respiratory system and anatomy of respiratory system and organ functions cannot be complete if you don’t understand the transition between CO2 and O2. Once air has been inhaled, it passed through the airways until it reaches the alveoli within the lungs. Alveolus are surrounded by capillaries, through which the gasses enter and exit. Carbon dioxide enters the alveolus, where oxygen is extracted and passed back into the body. The constant blood flow prevents saturation of the blood, allowing for optimal transfer. The following picture better illustrates the process: