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The new 2K scan also includes new interviews with actors Jessica Cauffiel, Denise Richards and Marley Shelton (all of whom recall their days gas utility shooting the film, their great working relationship with their director and their excitement about their bloody scenes); new — and lengthy — interviews with the co-writers electricity billy elliot karaoke Gretchen J. Berg and Aaron Harberts (detailing their history writing for 90210 to penning this script); new interviews with editor Steve Mirkovich (my favorite interview of the bunch, as he talks about working with John Carpenter) and composer Don Davis; a new director’s audio commentary; archival interviews gas stoichiometry with the cast and crew, behind-the-scenes (a super intimate portrait of what it’s truly like to be on a horror movie set and how the actors make light of the dark situation they’re portraying), and a theatrical trailer.

The Poison Ivy Collection (★★) Talk about a movie collection that will make you feel super dirty. But hey, everyone has their own tastes, like Fifty Shades of Grey or those gasbuddy touch sexy romance novels with punny character names. If that’s your thing, then The Poison Ivy Collection from Scream Factory should already be in your order cart. However, if you are hoping for gas vs electric range a good story, uh, you won’t find it.

The collection includes four films of seduction: the 1992 original Poison Ivy; 1996’s Poison Ivy 2: Lily; 1997’s Poison Ivy: The New Seduction; and 2008’s Poison Ivy: The Secret Society. Each film involves deception, betrayal, murder and sex — lots and lots of sex. Whether it’s a pool boy or a gross gas leak explosion dad who sleeps with his daughter’s BFF, you can expect the “bom chicka wah wah” music to cue up at any moment.

Of all the titles, the original Poison Ivy has the most going on… dramatically. It stars Drew Barrymore as the titular Ivy, a peculiar teen who becomes fast friends with rich girl — and seemingly grunge rocker — Sylvie ( Roseanne’s Sara Gilbert). Sylvie’s daddy (Tom Skerritt ogasco abu dhabi) develops a crush on Ivy a la American Beauty, and, well, you know the rest. But at least there are actual complex characters here and Leonardo DiCaprio. No joke! Leo gas exchange in the lungs is facilitated by pops up for literally seven seconds and almost gets top billing. I’m willing to bet you won’t even notice him unless you Google it.

The drama is no good, the characters are all jerks (so it’s OK that they kick the bucket) and the dialogue is elementary. In other words, it’s a B-movie that would be perfect for Alamo Drafthouse’s Video Vortex (where they gas news australia unearth bizarre VHS movies that go well with beer and a rowdy crowd laughing at their stupidity). These movies are a blast. You just gotta know what you’re stepping into and let the good times (and the heads) roll.

Extras: Vinegar Syndrome, a cult film releasing company, is relatively new to me. I bought my first copy of one of their releases last year at a film festival. But I quickly became a fan because their original artwork electricity generation by source by state, packaging and restoration are exquisite. For the Bloody New Year release, it truly power outage houston zip code feels like you’re watching a dirty old film copy. You can see visible lines across the screen and cigarette burns, and the sound occasionally hisses and pops, yet the 2K picture scan (from 35mm archival elements) is crystal. I almost recommend downloading a projector sound effect on your phone to play behind you as you watch the film to really sell the idea.

The limited-edition Blu-ray/DVD combo release (available for purchase through vinegarsyndrome.com, and there are only 3,000 copies) also includes a commentary what are the 4 gas giants in the solar system track with director Norman J. Warren ( Horror Planet). It’s not the most insightful gas and bloating pain commentary you will ever come across, as he’ll go off on tangents or not say much. But he does have a few good stories about securing locations and his intentions with certain moments. It might have been better if a film historian spoke on the film’s behalf, but it’s still cool to hear from the filmmaker himself.