Scar on retina – vision and eye disorders forum – ehealthforum gasco abu dhabi address

My daughter, now 16 (and driving!), was born with scar tissue in a sizeable area near her retina. We patched her "good" eye for 5 hours a day from the time we discovered it when she was 12 months old until she was in 1st grade. The doctors told me that because she was born with it, she will not know what it is like to have 20/20 vision and that her good eye will compensate. This seems to be what has happened for her. Every few years, I look to see if anything could be done about the scar tissue and this is how I found your post. Your daughter’s situation seemed so much like my daughter’s that I thought I would write and tell you that she is not blind nor does she have any sort of retina detachment. I think it is invaluable to patch up to about 6 or 7 years….it seems after that the brain connections are set in place and won’t be any different. My daughter had surgery on her eye to correct strabismus at age 3 and got glasses for near-sightedness when she was in 5th grade. For awhile, the glasses were used to correct near-sightness in both eyes, but now, she wears glasses that correct her vision in her left eye only….the one that does not have the scar tissue. Anyway, she was in cheerleading for sports (did all sorts of flips), gets good grades and is driving. It will be okay.

My daughter, now 16 (and driving!), was born with scar tissue in a sizeable area near her retina. We patched her "good" eye for 5 hours a day from the time we discovered it when she was 12 months old until she was in 1st grade. The doctors told me that because she was born with it, she will not know what it is like to have 20/20 vision and that her good eye will compensate. This seems to be what has happened for her. Every few years, I look to see if anything could be done about the scar tissue and this is how I found your post. Your daughter’s situation seemed so much like my daughter’s that I thought I would write and tell you that she is not blind nor does she have any sort of retina detachment. I think it is invaluable to patch up to about 6 or 7 years….it seems after that the brain connections are set in place and won’t be any different. My daughter had surgery on her eye to correct strabismus at age 3 and got glasses for near-sightedness when she was in 5th grade. For awhile, the glasses were used to correct near-sightness in both eyes, but now, she wears glasses that correct her vision in her left eye only….the one that does not have the scar tissue. Anyway, she was in cheerleading for sports (did all sorts of flips), gets good grades and is driving. It will be okay.

I’ve had a retina "fold" (I say this only because I found out later that it is scar tissue) since I was born, and I had been born with a lazy eye as well (same eye). My mother didn’t know she was pregnant with me until six months into the pregancy. I was patched when I was younger (which I absolutely loathed, in part because of the sticky substance from the patch pulling out eyebrow hair, but also from the headaches), and have had glasses as well (which eventually became contacts once it was possible). I’ve had two surgeries on my right eye, both of them to fix the lazy eye, and although it’s difficult to notice any laziness in my right eye (unless I’m exhausted, and then I stop paying attention which causes it to float outward), I still cannot see one object and depth perception has been a difficult thing to master. I’m not completely blind in my right eye, but because of the scarring it has made it difficult to have a sharp image (unless it’s about six inches from my face and I cover my left eye in the process). Shapes are fairly easy to discern as well as basic detail, but lettering, instructions, anything farther advanced than that is not really possible. To the parents (mothers?) that are worried about their child, I’m turning out okay (I’m only 22), so try not to panic. It’d still be really awesome to keep looking into it for them though: I wish my parents wouldn’t have given up on me. When I went to a specialist (it WAS only one opinion, but still) he had told me that removing the scar tissue would be like trying to remove a piece of scotch tape from a piece of paper: trying to completely separate them would almost be impossible without leaving some tape behind, or taking some paper with the tape. It was explained that I could turn out more blind than before, and I’m not willing to risk it yet. So far, I may never see one object and will always see two of everything (one image sharp, the other one fuzzy and to the upper left of the original image), but I’m not going to give up. I’m sure medicine will advance far enough for me to have my dream realized one day.