Seattle mariners’ cano suspended 80 games for drug violation – kget electricity vampires

Major League Baseball’s announcement was a stunning development for a middle-of-the-lineup stalwart and a club expected to contend for a postseason spot. Cano tested positive for Furosemide, a diuretic that can be used to mask performance-enhancing drugs.

"For more than fifteen years, playing professional baseball has been the greatest honor and privilege of my life," Cano said. "I would never do anything to cheat the rules of the game that I love, and after undergoing dozens of drug tests over more than a decade, I have never tested positive for a performance enhancing substance for the simple reason that I have never taken one," Cano said in the statement issued by the players’ association.

"Today I decided to accept MLB’s suspension. This was the most difficult decision I have ever made in my life, but ultimately the right decision given that I do not dispute that I was given this substance. I apologize to my family, friends, fans, teammates and the Mariners organization."

"We love Robinson Cano. We really do and what he means to our ballclub and the organization. But just like a family member makes a bad decision or a bad choice, you still love them," Servais said. "Robinson will be back and will be a big part of our team going forward but in the short term he’s not going to be here."

Cano is the biggest baseball star busted since Melky Cabrera was suspended in 2012 while leading the National League in hitting. There have been 36 players suspended this year under the minor league drug program and six in addition to Cano under the big league program: Houston pitcher Dean Deetz, Washington catcher Raudy Read, Pittsburgh pitcher Nik Turley, Kansas City outfielder Jorge Bonifacio, Toronto pitcher Thomas Pannone and Minnesota shortstop Jorge Polanco.

If no games are postponed, Cano would be eligible to return Aug. 14 at Oakland. In the short-term, Seattle will use Gordon Beckham and Andrew Romine to fill the void at second base, but Servais and Dipoto spoke with outfielder Dee Gordon about a possible move back to second base. Gordon was a Gold Glove winner at the position in Miami, but made the switch to center field after being traded to Seattle.

"For myself, it was tough. Personally, I didn’t have the statistical value Robinson Cano had at that point in my career when I went through it," Gordon said. "I felt like I had to prove to everyone that I could play when I came back. I thank God he has some stats and everyone knows how good he is."

Because the substance involved was a diuretic, the drug agreement called for Cano to be retested. The next step was for Thomas Martin, the independent program administrator hired by the MLB and the players’ association, to determine whether the use of Furosemide was an attempt to "to substitute, dilute, mask or adulterate a specimen or in any other manner alter a test," according to the joint drug program.

After Martin made that determination, the union filed a grievance last month. The case was scheduled to be heard starting Tuesday in Seattle before arbitrator Mark Irvings, but the union informed MLB last Friday that Cano wanted to drop the grievance and reach a settlement, the person said. MLB Senior Vice President Patrick Houlihan and union deputy general counsel Matt Nussbaum then worked to reach the agreement to accept the discipline.

It was the first major strike in a career that has Hall of Fame potential. Cano was trending toward becoming one of the few current players with a chance to reach 3,000 hits in his career and has been a consummate defensive standout. Cano is an eight-time All-Star -he was the MVP of the game a year ago – but now must deal with the stigma of a suspension.

The suspension was announced two days after the first significant injury during Cano’s tenure in Seattle. Cano landed on the disabled list Monday, a day after a bone in his right hand was broken when hit by a pitch in Detroit. Cano was examined Tuesday in Philadelphia by Dr Randall Culp and is expected to have surgery on the injury on Wednesday. Since 2007, Cano has played at least 150 games each season.