Sen. thune visits young afterschool advocates in summit, s.d. maharashtra electricity e bill payment

#########

“I mean it takes 45 minutes to get groceries. We don’t have many opportunities for kids to do anything. electricity review worksheet We don’t have a Boys and Girls Club or a community center,” said Dawn Marie Johnson, a Summit resident. “There’s a church, a gas station, and maybe one or two local businesses. There’s one park. But otherwise the opportunity for kids to do something after school, or to have a safe space, there hasn’t been anything until our afterschool program.”

Johnson is also the afterschool program director at the Summit School has roughly 180 students and serves grades K-12. As Johnson put it, the school is surprisingly diverse for what one would typically expect of a rural South Dakota community. Located in close proximity to the nearby Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Reservation, the school serves a significant population of Native students, as well as Hispanic students. In a community so small, you can imagine the excitement when the school received word that Sen. John Thune would be visiting the school to speak to Summit’s students.

Johnson recognized the opportunity the senator’s visit presented for her to talk to him about how vital the afterschool program is to Summit. The Summit Afterschool Program is completely reliant upon 21 st Century Community Learning Center (21 st CCLC) funding. The precarious status of the program’s funding is not only a staff concern; according to Johnson, her students are keenly aware of the president’s proposed elimination of the 21 st CCLC initiative, and it’s a cause they’ve taken up on behalf of their program.

“I think [what makes us] different from other people who have had the grant for so long is that we started out with this loss,” Johnson explained. “We had this grant for maybe three to four months, and then there’s this huge budget cut in our face and we’re faced with losing it right away. So our kids are really well-versed in what our grant is, and why we have it, and that it’s our sole funding to keep the program alive. electricity units of measurement And so the kids themselves are always advocating for it.”

Johnson managed to win over Sen. Thune’s assistant, but she knew that it wasn’t particularly likely the senator would stop by the program; members of Congress, especially ones as prominent as Sen. 935 gas block Thune, have tight schedules and many priorities. But then the senator took a question a student—a high school senior who had been texted by a 2018 graduate who had served as one of the afterschool program’s youth leaders.

“Summit is not the only community who has positively impacted by this [21 st Century Community Learning Center] grant in South Dakota. According to the South Dakota Argus Leader, 6,000 students are enrolled in the [21 st CCLC] program across the state,” the student started. “The Senate did pass an appropriations bill that keeps the 21 st Century program level-funded for 2019, but my question is, would you ever support a budget that includes this program being cut?”

Thune’s answer—while not an outright promise to vote against a budget that eliminated the 21 st CCLC initiative—affirmed that he would always support a program that demonstrated it was valuable to the children it serves. He did so emphatically enough that the crowd started cheering and whooping. This prompted the school’s business manager to step forward.

“I’m on the side just tearing up just a little bit because you don’t really realize, even those one or two times some kids are hanging out after school for homework, they still find it so beneficial,” she said. “I’m used to my K-8 th grade crew, they have solid attendance. But to see the whole student body of 180 kids stand up, I just felt—oh my gosh.”

“I have the best students, and they’re all on board,” she said. “When we have visitors, I am never the person that gives the tour, I’m never the person that talks to them about our program. It’s always the kids that do it. electricity and magnetism notes So even with our Lights On Afterschool event that’s coming up, I’m taking four 7 th grade gals to a couple of radio stations and they’re going to be the ones that talk about it, not me.”

“I mean it takes 45 minutes to get groceries. We don’t have many opportunities for kids to do anything. We don’t have a Boys and Girls Club or a community center,” said Dawn Marie Johnson, a Summit resident. “There’s a church, a gas station, and maybe one or two local businesses. There’s one park. But otherwise the opportunity for kids to do something after school, or to have a safe space, there hasn’t been anything until our afterschool program.”

Johnson is also the afterschool program director at the Summit School has roughly 180 students and serves grades K-12. electricity bill average As Johnson put it, the school is surprisingly diverse for what one would typically expect of a rural South Dakota community. Located in close proximity to the nearby Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Reservation, the school serves a significant population of Native students, as well as Hispanic students. In a community so small, you can imagine the excitement when the school received word that Sen. John Thune would be visiting the school to speak to Summit’s students.

Johnson recognized the opportunity the senator’s visit presented for her to talk to him about how vital the afterschool program is to Summit. The Summit Afterschool Program is completely reliant upon 21 st Century Community Learning Center (21 st CCLC) funding. The precarious status of the program’s funding is not only a staff concern; according to Johnson, her students are keenly aware of the president’s proposed elimination of the 21 st CCLC initiative, and it’s a cause they’ve taken up on behalf of their program.

“I think [what makes us] different from other people who have had the grant for so long is that we started out with this loss,” Johnson explained. “We had this grant for maybe three to four months, and then there’s this huge budget cut in our face and we’re faced with losing it right away. So our kids are really well-versed in what our grant is, and why we have it, and that it’s our sole funding to keep the program alive. And so the kids themselves are always advocating for it.”

Johnson managed to win over Sen. Thune’s assistant, but she knew that it wasn’t particularly likely the senator would stop by the program; members of Congress, especially ones as prominent as Sen. Thune, have tight schedules and many priorities. But then the senator took a question a student—a high school senior who had been texted by a 2018 graduate who had served as one of the afterschool program’s youth leaders.

“Summit is not the only community who has positively impacted by this [21 st Century Community Learning Center] grant in South Dakota. According to the South Dakota Argus Leader, 6,000 students are enrolled in the [21 st CCLC] program across the state,” the student started. “The Senate did pass an appropriations bill that keeps the 21 st Century program level-funded for 2019, but my question is, would you ever support a budget that includes this program being cut?”

Thune’s answer—while not an outright promise to vote against a budget that eliminated the 21 st CCLC initiative—affirmed that he would always support a program that demonstrated it was valuable to the children it serves. He did so emphatically enough that the crowd started cheering and whooping. This prompted the school’s business manager to step forward.

“I’m on the side just tearing up just a little bit because you don’t really realize, even those one or two times some kids are hanging out after school for homework, they still find it so beneficial,” she said. “I’m used to my K-8 th grade crew, they have solid attendance. But to see the whole student body of 180 kids stand up, I just felt—oh my gosh.”

“I have the best students, and they’re all on board,” she said. “When we have visitors, I am never the person that gives the tour, I’m never the person that talks to them about our program. It’s always the kids that do it. gas vs electric oven review So even with our Lights On Afterschool event that’s coming up, I’m taking four 7 th grade gals to a couple of radio stations and they’re going to be the ones that talk about it, not me.”