Shock feeling when almost asleep – sleep disorders forum – ehealthforum gas density calculator

People who see ghosts and demons and stuff are just really scared when they suddenly are paralyzed, and become irrational and think that it could be a supernatural being. They then think of their image of a scary demon and then see an exact replica of their imaginary monster. If they were to think about puppies, they could actually experience crazy lucid dreaming because it’s so real as you feel as if you are awake, and are much more "in touch" with your imaginary surroundings. The experience also is very memorable, because the closer to waking up a person becomes, the more they remember about the dream. People get this in the middle of the night because a person completes, on average, 3 sleep cycles and when you may be your closest to waking up, in "Stage 1" you actually wake up. The jolt is either imaginary as a person would associate such a jolt back to reality with being zapped by electricity, and as they are still dreaming they imagine the zap and think it’s real. This is why you always get it at the start of your sleep. If you take ritalin (methylphenidate) or amphetamines for ADD/narcolepsy (not sure if that’s spellt correctly), the stimulant effect these medications/drugs have on the body could send jolts of energy created by the stimulant. You will be just about to fall asleep and your body is still "stimulated" so doesn’t allow you to fall asleep, and the jolting feeling is being forced out of dreamland, while one normally wakes up willingly.

(Also, you may be experiencing ringing sounds in the ear at times (tinnitus). And you’ll know when you have it, if you have ringing in your ears only when you really listen for it, it’s not tinnitus. Tinnitus is when you can’t ignore it, and it’s actually really loud. I get that sometimes.

People who see ghosts and demons and stuff are just really scared when they suddenly are paralyzed, and become irrational and think that it could be a supernatural being. They then think of their image of a scary demon and then see an exact replica of their imaginary monster. If they were to think about puppies, they would picture puppies and then actually see the imagine in front of them. They could experience crazy lucid dreaming because it’s seems so real, as you feel as if you are awake, and are much more "in touch" with your imaginary surroundings. The experience also is very memorable, because the closer to waking up a person becomes, the more they remember about the dream. People get this in the middle of the night because a person completes, on average, 3 sleep cycles and when you may be your closest to waking up, in "Stage 1" you actually wake up. The jolt is either imaginary as a person would associate such a jolt back to reality with being zapped by electricity, and as they are still dreaming they imagine the zap and think it’s real. This is why you always get it at the start of your sleep. If you take ritalin (methylphenidate) or amphetamines for ADD/narcolepsy (not sure if that’s spellt correctly), the stimulant effect these medications/drugs have on the body could send jolts of energy created by the stimulant. You will be just about to fall asleep and your body is still "stimulated" so doesn’t allow you to fall asleep, and the jolting feeling is being forced out of dreamland, while one normally wakes up willingly.

(Also, you may be experiencing ringing sounds in the ear at times (tinnitus). And you’ll know when you have it, if you have ringing in your ears only when you really listen for it, it’s not tinnitus. Tinnitus is when you can’t ignore it, and it’s actually really loud. I get that sometimes.