Shots given to calves when they are born is there a gas station near me

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Tennessee…We don’t give anything to newborn calves as long as they are healthy and mama is doing her job. If the cows are healthy and protected like they should be, and the calf comes out and does what he’s supposed to do, then he should be protected against anything that cow has any antibodies toward. If a calf doesn’t get colostrum or something goes wrong, then it’s a different deal, and we handle that on a case-by-case basis with the goal of getting the calf going strong and back on mama as soon as possible (assuming that’s an option).

We calve most of our cows in January and have a few fall calvers as well. We try to make sure they’re all in a suitable pasture for calving…dry ground with cover/protection from any possible weather, plenty of good hay and plenty of water. The first thing I would do if/when I do anything is to spray the navel with Iodine, and I don’t really worry about that unless something calves around the barn or somewhere that’s not as clean as I’d like it to be. I’ve seen a calf with navel ill before, and you don’t want that. There’s not much way to save one of those.

The ONE thing I absolutely insist on is — ALPHA-7 as soon as they are awake and breathing, long before they ever get up 98% of the time. Since I started this 20 years ago, I have never lost a calf to Clostridium C-D, or for that matter — any scours we used to have is flat gone too. Clostridium;s are in the ground every ehere, but it is far worse in areas of wet, cold and muddy winters. The bug is injested by the calves either by first nursing muudy uddered cows, or a few days later, they will almost always be seen licking a dry area of dirt. I always asked my self why this was the case, and realized that after a few days or a week, the calves stomach lining is iritated from the mild accidosis that raw milk causes (High PH and mild when raw, but lower Ph to accidic when fermented). The calves feel some distress so will eat dirt to help scratch the stomach lining, thus injesting the Clostridium.

Most or at least a very high percentage of calves affected by C-D will show up close to the 30 day time line. Some a week sooner or later. The Alpha 7 is formulated for newborns, and is given Sub-Q at 2 ml. I always repeat with Vision-8 at 30 days. Works like a charm, and you will sleep well knowing that! There is nothing worse than finding a perfectly healthy calf one day and is dead the next!

Alpha 7 is a 7-way Clostridium vaccine that protects against Blackleg and other diseases caused by Clostridia bacteria. Manufactured by BI and available at most farm supply stores that sell cattle vaccines…in the refrigerated section. My opinion is that cows should pass early protection to their newborn calves in the colostrum, and vaccines are not needed at birth. Or SHOULDN’T be needed if the cows are sufficiently protected. I think most vaccine salespeople and manufacturers will tell you the same thing. In our area at least, and I think most parts of the country, ALL calves should be vaccinated for blackleg by the time they are a few months old. The protection they receive from their mother’s colostrum will fade, and it will depend on several factors that determine how much protection the calf received from her anyway. For instance, a two year old heifer hasn’t been exposed to all the germs in her lifetime that a mature cow has been, so a cow’s colostrum is probably more potent in terms of antibodies. Also, it’s pretty understood that cows that give MORE milk have LESS concentrated colostrum…since a calf gets less milk from a lower producing cow, it makes sense that her colostrum has to be more concentrated to give her calf ample protection. This is just Mother Nature taking care of her babies…

There are other Blackleg vaccines available. Alpha 7 is popular because it protects with one shot…no booster needed 3-6 weeks after like a lot of other brands. If you aren’t vaccinating for Blackleg and haven’t lost a calf, consider yourself lucky and start doing it! It’s CHEAP vaccine. Our calves get Blackleg vaccination when we vaccinate our cows before breeding season, so the calves are approximately 30-60 days old. Then we vaccinate for 4-way respiratory and 5-way Lepto at weaning.

Quote from: leanbeef on February 03, 2012, 01:38:58 PM Alpha 7 is a 7-way Clostridium vaccine that protects against Blackleg and other diseases caused by Clostridia bacteria. Manufactured by BI and available at most farm supply stores that sell cattle vaccines…in the refrigerated section. My opinion is that cows should pass early protection to their newborn calves in the colostrum, and vaccines are not needed at birth. Or SHOULDN’T be needed if the cows are sufficiently protected. I think most vaccine salespeople and manufacturers will tell you the same thing. In our area at least, and I think most parts of the country, ALL calves should be vaccinated for blackleg by the time they are a few months old. The protection they receive from their mother’s colostrum will fade, and it will depend on several factors that determine how much protection the calf received from her anyway. For instance, a two year old heifer hasn’t been exposed to all the germs in her lifetime that a mature cow has been, so a cow’s colostrum is probably more potent in terms of antibodies. Also, it’s pretty understood that cows that give MORE milk have LESS concentrated colostrum…since a calf gets less milk from a lower producing cow, it makes sense that her colostrum has to be more concentrated to give her calf ample protection. This is just Mother Nature taking care of her babies…

There are other Blackleg vaccines available. Alpha 7 is popular because it protects with one shot…no booster needed 3-6 weeks after like a lot of other brands. If you aren’t vaccinating for Blackleg and haven’t lost a calf, consider yourself lucky and start doing it! It’s CHEAP vaccine. Our calves get Blackleg vaccination when we vaccinate our cows before breeding season, so the calves are approximately 30-60 days old. Then we vaccinate for 4-way respiratory and 5-way Lepto at weaning.