Significant change in mpg, why 2015 sfs 2.0 – page 8 – hyundai forums hyundai forum electricity labs for middle school

I don’t think brakes are covered under the warranty (at least pads, rotors and calipers) but please correct me if I’m wrong because I would prefer to have them done for nothing! I’m sure if I take it back they’ll say that whoever put on the rear pads did something wrong (I know that not to be true but we have a really crappy dealer here, a monopoly with no other dealer close) and that they won’t cover.

I would love to go back to the shop that did my alignment, show them the above link and bit** them out but they’ll come up with some reason as to why they did it. As you can tell I’ve heard every story from dealers, garages, etc. so I’ve completely given up. I wonder if I should take the car to the dealer and ask them about the alignment and refer to the link? Maybe they could align it they way it’s supposed to be? I agree that it’s strange we both have the same problem with the same situation beforehand.

I can see pads and rotors ("normal" wear items), but calipers….No way. It would be going for warranty for a vehicle thats 3 years old with 35K miles if it was me. My buddy has a Sonata and took it in for a headlight bulb and they did it under warranty.

I doubt that driving in these conditions would be a case for a warranty claim, she could try. Having to replace pads at less than 35K miles means there is a lot of grit getting in there. We blew through pads on our ATV’s in 2 or 3 rides due to mud and grit while other same model ATV’s would go years when not subjected to the same conditions.

Brihvac – I’m pretty sure they’d laugh at me if I went in and asked for new calipers, our area is nasty in the winter – and as I said, not that they would know, where I live they put the worst stuff I’ve ever seen on the road. I’m sure they have other people coming in that are rural and see the same thing. I may try emailing the service manager for the heck of it but I can assume he would only say "bring it in and we’ll check it". At this point, it’s easier to pay the 100 bucks for calipers (and whatever for pads) than to go in there and sit for 3 hours waiting to see if they think they need replacing then waiting longer for them to decide if it’s under normal warranty. Don’t get me wrong, I think they should be covered too but sometimes you have to pick your battles, ha ha. IF I do not see an improvement after that I’ll be going in to see if they can look it over.

Well I was expecting a response from some Canadian owners as I recollect more than one saying they do annual inspecting cleaning and relubing their brakes, certainly any proper brake job involves cleaning and regreasing the slide pins, as well as inspecting the piston and removing any dirt/deposits, usually with fine emery paper – having grown up in Buffalo NY I’m well versed at rebuilding brake calipers, I think one can still buy the seal kits. I think IM Stricken may done a video tutorial on servicing the brakes.

Alignment would have to be drastically out of spec, steering might be feel off or pulling and noticeable on tire wear after several k miles to take a big chunk out of fuel economy, I posted the link to tire rack because it’s somewhat contrary to most thinking that new tires might actually result in a short term decline in fuel economy.

For verifying brake drag I prefer to a visual comparison of wear of pads on an axle as well as a spin of the wheel. I don’t know much about the transmission whether a non functional lockup torque converter generates a code, the Hyundai box seems very reliable, I think lock works in 4,5 and 6 gears. The drive train is pretty smooth overall, I can’t say I can discern engagement/disengagement of the AWD system, if for some reason stuck in AWD mode it’s going to impact mpgs.

Well I was expecting a response from some Canadian owners as I recollect more than one saying they do annual inspecting cleaning and relubing their brakes, certainly any proper brake job involves cleaning and regreasing the slide pins, as well as inspecting the piston and removing any dirt/deposits, usually with fine emery paper – having grown up in Buffalo NY I’m well versed at rebuilding brake calipers, I think one can still buy the seal kits. I think IM Stricken may done a video tutorial on servicing the brakes.

As grime builds up on calipers, it will eventually work its way into important internal components. That can lead to calipers that either under-perform or seize up entirely. The same thing can happen with older rear drum brake setups given enough contamination. Seized calipers or shoes will wear out brake pads quickly and cause a lot of damage if the situation isn’t rectified in short order.

Road dirt and gunk can eventually build up to a point where it messes with mechanical parts like emergency brake cables. If you don’t use your parking brake very often, it can result in a seized cable that locks up during sub-zero conditions. Electronic automatic parking brake systems are especially prone to locking up when it’s extremely cold out. February is a prime month for such issues.

I am glad I live somewhere winter is not a factor. I had to clean and lube the pins on my brakes on the ATV’s pretty often, I would hate to have to do that with a vehicle. Now I know why people don’t recommend buying a car from a Northern state.