Sky rocketing fuel prices page 11 sportfishing bc electricity manipulation

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In the long term it would also be a driving force in increasing the price of fuel to the average BC’er, to the extent we currently get a significant chunk of our fuel from Alberta, as the people of BC and Alberta would be competing more with Asia for the cost of fuel. You can see why BC’ers are conflicted. In exchange for being good neighbors to our friends to the east, we get to accept the risks and costs associated with the expanded pipeline and increased tanker traffic and get to pay higher fuel costs once it is all in place because of the increased competition, without the offsetting benefit to our economy that Alberta would get.

On the other hand BC has been happy to benefit from and to let the people of Alberta accept the heavy environmental damage and costs, like effects on health, in order to do all that extensive hydro carbon extraction without having to screw up our own province tapping much of our own oil and gas reserves, although the oil would be cleaner than Alberta’s Tar Sands. I am not sure people know BC has oil and gas reserves both on land and off shore that are going undeveloped, I suspect because of environmental concerns.

I am happy to leave it in the ground and under the sea as in a 100 years or so our children’s children’s children may well want it for things that have not even been invented yet such as new plastics and medications. As some have indicated fuel is the least valuable use for it. If we ever really needed it however, I think there is enough to keep BC fuel self sufficient for a long time although we currently lack the refining capacity to be self reliant. Long term our transportation needs will increasingly be met by electricity and BC has world class potential to develop additional hydro, wind, tidal and even some geothermal power, which one day we may be exporting to Alberta, assuming they are not protesting new power lines, after all, they do cause cancer if you live close to them.

In short everything from Jerry cans to telling them you filled up your trailered boat with built in gas tanks faces an excise duty often between $0.10 – $0.11/per litre. As for the boat not worth it unless you enter the USA by water which is not practical for me. There seems in my view to be some leeway for jerry cans for the number of people I see who transport extra fuel this way. 1 jerry can I expect would be simply ignored and possibly 2 but CBSA of course won’t officially tell you that. The lineup would be out the door and CBSA would be overwhelmed with the process.

In accordance with the Customs Act, the Customs Tariff, and the Excise Tax Act, gasoline acquired in the United States, whether imported in a vehicle tank, a slip tank, containers commonly known as “jerry cans”, or any container other than the manufacturer-installed fuel tank(s), is subject to full assessment of duty and taxes by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). It is recommended that you keep a separate receipt for the cost of the fuel pumped in the slip tank or other non-manufacturer-installed containers to facilitate the assessment of taxes.

P lease note that, where applicable, the goods and services tax (GST), the provincial sales tax (PST), or the harmonized sales tax (HST), are calculated on the duty-paid value of the price you have paid for the goods converted into Canadian currency. An excise duty often between $0.10 – $0.11/per litre would also be applied:

In addition, please be advised that Transport Canada puts conditions on the manner of transporting dangerous goods. Therefore, it is recommended that you contact Transport Canada for information on transporting excess fuel in a safe and approved method.

Should you require additional assistance with your inquiry, we recommend that you contact the Border Information Service (BIS). You can access the BIS line free of charge throughout Canada by calling 1-800-461-9999. If you are calling from outside Canada, you can access the BIS line by calling either 204-983-3500 or 506-636-5064 (long-distance charges will apply). If you call during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, except holidays), you can speak to an officer by pressing “0” at any time after you have made a selection of either English or French.

In short everything from Jerry cans to telling them you filled up your trailered boat with built in gas tanks faces an excise duty often between $0.10 – $0.11/per litre. As for the boat not worth it unless you enter the USA by water which is not practical for me. There seems in my view to be some leeway for jerry cans for the number of people I see who transport extra fuel this way. 1 jerry can I expect would be simply ignored and possibly 2 but CBSA of course won’t officially tell you that. The lineup would be out the door and CBSA would be overwhelmed with the process.

In accordance with the Customs Act, the Customs Tariff, and the Excise Tax Act, gasoline acquired in the United States, whether imported in a vehicle tank, a slip tank, containers commonly known as “jerry cans”, or any container other than the manufacturer-installed fuel tank(s), is subject to full assessment of duty and taxes by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). It is recommended that you keep a separate receipt for the cost of the fuel pumped in the slip tank or other non-manufacturer-installed containers to facilitate the assessment of taxes.

P lease note that, where applicable, the goods and services tax (GST), the provincial sales tax (PST), or the harmonized sales tax (HST), are calculated on the duty-paid value of the price you have paid for the goods converted into Canadian currency. An excise duty often between $0.10 – $0.11/per litre would also be applied:

In addition, please be advised that Transport Canada puts conditions on the manner of transporting dangerous goods. Therefore, it is recommended that you contact Transport Canada for information on transporting excess fuel in a safe and approved method.

Should you require additional assistance with your inquiry, we recommend that you contact the Border Information Service (BIS). You can access the BIS line free of charge throughout Canada by calling 1-800-461-9999. If you are calling from outside Canada, you can access the BIS line by calling either 204-983-3500 or 506-636-5064 (long-distance charges will apply). If you call during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, except holidays), you can speak to an officer by pressing “0” at any time after you have made a selection of either English or French.