Small-batch cookie dough frosting – baking mischief gas up the jet

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This Small-batch Cookie Dough Frosting tastes just like an extra creamy batch of cookie dough that you happen to get to spread over a cupcake. If you’ve ever made chocolate chip cookies and been tempted to just eat the dough by the spoonful instead of baking it, this is the frosting for you.

Hey, friends, I have another small-batch frosting recipe for you today. I started sharing these frosting recipes alongside my small-batch cupcakes back in August because I wanted you guys to be able to mix and match small-batch cupcakes and frostings to make whatever kinds of cupcake creations you were craving.

And if you haven’t tried it yet, this frosting is crazy good. If you’ve ever made chocolate chip cookies (these Small-batch Chocolate Chip Cookies perhaps?) and been tempted to just eat the dough by the spoonful instead of baking it, this is the frosting for you. It tastes just like an extra creamy batch of cookie dough that you happen to get to spread over a cupcake.

Like my other small-batch frosting recipes, this Cookie Dough Frosting makes about one cup of frosting and is enough to generously top four to six cupcakes with a piping bag or about eight cookies or cupcakes when spread on with a knife. It’s fabulous over cupcakes, but I’m currently dreaming of spreading it over brownies, or maybe even sugar cookies…

The reason this Cookie Dough Frosting tastes like cookie dough because it is essentially cookie dough, minus the eggs and leaveners and with slightly different ingredient ratios. It’s even made the same way. Just like with cookie dough, you start by creaming softened butter and brown sugar, adding vanilla, and then beating in the flour and salt. But then instead of putting that mixture into the oven, you drizzle in some milk or cream and beat the frosting until it is light and fluffy before folding in lots of chocolate chips.

If you’re reading this thinking that flour seems like an odd ingredient for frosting, 1) it’s actually really important to the flavor. Part of the cookie dough taste is the flour taste. You might not think of flour as tasting like anything, but it absolutely does. And 2) flour is used in frosting all the time. There’s actually an entire category of frosting called Flour Buttercream or Ermine Frosting made with flour, so it’s way less strange than you might think.

As with under-cooked eggs, consuming raw flour does run the very slight risk of food poisoning, so if you’re concerned about that, you can absolutely cook your flour before adding it to your frosting. I do find that cooking the flour removes the raw flour taste which is part of the cookie dough flavor (I know, who knew there were so many facets to the taste of flour), but your frosting will still be excellent.

To cook your flour, simply line a baking sheet with parchment paper and spread your flour out over the top. Bake at 350°F for 10 minutes and then allow the flour to cool completely. Baked flour has a tendency to clump together, so you’ll need to sift it to get rid of any lumps, but after that, you’re just a few minutes and a few ingredients from the Cookie Dough Frosting of your dreams.

• Properly softened butter is a MUST for the frosting recipe. If your butter is not soft enough, the ingredients will not mix completely and you will end up with little flour lumps in your frosting. You want butter that is not melted but soft enough to easily squish with a finger. This shouldn’t be a problem during the summer, but in cold kitchens during the winter, you might need to cut the butter into cubes and place somewhere warm for a couple minutes.

• Finally, I recommend using a handheld electric mixer for the frosting. Small-batch frostings can usually be made by hand in a pinch, but I suspect you’ll have a hard time getting the flour to mix completely in this recipe if doing it by hand.