Talpirid mole bait p gasol stats

Talpirid Mole Bait has repeatedly proven effective in killing moles quickly and long term. Talpirid Mole Bait is our number one seller for mole control and is not matched as a mole bait. Talpirid Mole Bait has proven effective through various field tests. Researchers put Talpirid’s bait performance to the test throughout the United States, examining its effectiveness on various moles species, different soil types and baiting conditions and it has been top rated. Why Talpirid Mole Bait Is Top Rated – It Mimics Earthworms

Talpirid Mole Bait is a mole bait designed, developed, and scientifically proven to kill moles. After much research and development, Bell Labs has manufactured Talpirid Mole Bait to closely resemble the earthworm (the mole’s preferred food source). Talpird Mole Bait is also the only mole bait on the market that has submitted tests to the EPA with laboratory efficacy tests on moles.

Ready to use Talpirid Mole Bait has a unique size, shape, and feel that mimic a mole’s natural food source, the earthworm, and its active ingredient capitalizes on a mole’s physiology. In field and laboratory tests, Talpirid Mole Bait has achieved outstanding acceptance and control.

Make a hole in the top of the runway with a rod lightly larger than the diameter of the bait. Drop one worm into the runway, using the rod to push any exposed bait completely into the runway. Carefully reseal the runway with a small amount of dirt to exclude light.

Make a hole in the top of the runway with a rod lightly larger than the diameter of the bait. Drop one worm into the runway, using the rod to push any exposed bait completely into the runway. Carefully reseal the runway with a small amount of dirt to exclude light. Repeat bait application every 5 to 10 feet of each active subsurface runway. Selection of Treatment Areas

Use your finger, small wooden dowel, or a narrow rod to puncture a hole in the top of subsurface runways. Be careful not to crush runways. Mark opened runways and revisit them 48 to 72 hours later. Runways that have had holes resealed within 72 hours should be baited.

The presence of moles may be indicated by a network of subsurface runways in the turf or by a series of conical mounds of earth pushed up from deep burrows. Subsurface runways are indicated by raised ridges of vegetation and soil caused by moles foraging for food just below the soil surface. These runways are especially noticeable when the grass above them turns yellow. Conical mounds may be indicative of the location of deeper main underground runways. Conical Mounds:

Moles construct deeper tunnels that are not visible from the surface. These deep tunnels systems are often marked by a series of conical mounds (piles of dirt) 4 to 12 inches high formed when dirt is pushed to the surface when moles construct these tunnels. To locate deep tunnels, push a probe, such as a broom handle, into the soil between mounds. When the probe enters a tunnel, the resistance on the probe will decrease rapidly. Mark opened tunnels and revisit them 48 to 72 hours later. Runways that have had holes resealed within 72 hours should be baited. Deep Tunnels

To bait deep tunnels, drop one Talpirid worm through the probe hole, using the probe to push the bait completely into the tunnel. Cover the hole with a piece of sod, a small rock or a piece of newspaper to allow for visual inspection. Repeat bait application every 5 to 10 feet of each active deep tunnel and within 5 feet of each active conical mound. Check for the effects of treatment 5 to 7 days after bait application using the same procedure for determining tunnel location. Return 48 to 72 hours later and retreat all active tunnel systems