The c-brats – evinrude e-tec g2 outboards shale gas in spanish

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Well I have been interested in buying a C-Dory pocket cruiser and all are outboard powered, so I have paid close attention to the tests published by BoatTEST. They test everything from 60′ plush diesel cruisers to bass boats. They instrument the boats that they test with Flowscan or similar fuel flow gauges and report fuel consumption and gas news australia speed at various engine rpms.

So switching to the outboard tests I noticed that the E-TEC always comes up with about 12 hp per GPH of fuel at both wot rpms as well as mid range. No other outboard- Honda, Yamaha, Mercury, etc comes close. Most of the later hit 10-11 hp per gph at wot and often no better at midrange. Interestingly the E-TEC is about as good as the inboard gassers.

So how can this be? Well the E-TEC is an interesting engine. When emissions became important twenty years or so ago, most manufacturers switched to 4 strokes. The old two strokes with their carbureted fuel systems let lots of fuel go out the exhaust on the charging/sweeping half stroke and what are the 4 gas giants in the solar system were smoky (oil mixture) and wasted lots of fuel. Some of these smaller outboards only got 5-6 hp per gph.

Bombardier, the Canadian manufacturer of snowmobiles and airplanes bought Evinrude and developed the E-TEC engine out of the remnants of the older FICHT engine. It was a success. In addition to direct injection, the engine uses a point oiling system that sends a measured amount of lube oil to the bearings and electricity sources uk piston/cylinder walls. The oil delivery is tightly controlled to the point that any bearing seal leakage or excess oil on the piston/cylinder wall just gets burned up (well not entirely) in the combustion. The E-TEC doen’t use any more oil than a 4 stroke and you only have to replenish the oil reservoir every 300 hours.

My only nagging concern relates to an issue with electricity generation by source by state my last Fitch Evinrude. The oil pump went out–I made it back (many miles on Powell) with a small kicker. You cannot put oil in the gas–like the old 2 strokes….The other problem was the only dealer was who had a computer program for diagnosis, was in Las Vegas and he was booked up for several months–even for just a computer read out (bad business–but it stays in Las Vegas!). We finally found someone who had a pirated computer program, and got the diagnosis–and a new oil pump….That p gaskell was an engine 20 years old at this point–and long in the junk heap by now.

Yamaha did a lot of promotional marketing in 3rd world countries–way under pricing, with very liberal financing for a number of years to get their product and mechanics established. We watched this happening over a number of years–and cruising these areas we asked why the Yamaha’s–we got our answers they almost gave them away–at least for cost…

During much of this time OMC (Evinrude the old company, was struggling). Suzuki did some of this marketing as did Honda. At one time it was Johnson you would see in many of these countries–they were simple, rugged and ran. We carried a lot of plugs power outage houston zip code and a few other spares (impellers, fuel pump parts) with us, so we could repair the older OMC outboards for people we met.

We have a 2007 90 hp Etec. So far a good motor. Certainly, if your nearest Etec dealer is distant, makes sense to go with a brand which can be serviced locally. We have a cottage on an island near Honey electricity 2014 Harbor, ON, in southern end of the 30k islands. The Honey Harbor Boat Club in Honey Harbor is an Evinrude dealer. They are capable and quick. In fact, one must go to Midland ON to have a Yamaha serviced by a dealer. That is about 15 miles by water and 30 miles by land from us. While that area of G Bay seems remote, there are boats all over the place, and mechanics in towns such as Parry Sound, Britt, Killarney, Little current etc if help is needed.

I repowered a Rosborough RF246 with a 2017 Evinrude 300HP G2. It cost $28,600 and had an 8 year warranty that covered all you would expect except corrosion. I never liked the motor. It was slick with the electric shifting and had an excellent instrument panel. The motor had unusable power for my hull. There was no hole shot capability. If I applied power too quickly the list of electricity usage by appliances prop would spin with not enough bite to push the 7000 pound boat regardless of prop selection. Mid range power had a noticeable skip. The dealer explained that it was a characteristic of the motors fuel delivery system. At WOT I could gas mask ark get it up to 35MPH which is unstable for a semi displacement hull.

Yamaha did a lot of promotional marketing in 3rd world countries–way under pricing, with very liberal financing for a number of years to get their product and mechanics established. We watched this happening over a number of years–and cruising these areas we asked why the Yamaha’s–we got our answers they almost gave them away–at least for cost…

During much of this time OMC (Evinrude the old company, was struggling). Suzuki did some of this marketing as did Honda. At one time it was Johnson you would see in many of these countries–they were simple, rugged and ran. We carried a lot of plugs and a few other spares (impellers, fuel pump parts) with us, so we could repair the older OMC outboards for people we met.

John, I spend 80% of my boating time on the BC coast and I would say I see electricity origin more, (Maybe not 80% but better than 50%) Yamaha on the working boats and many of the recreational boats up there. In talking with the water taxi folks, the fish farm and log camp tenders and many others there, the answer is easy. It is easy to get parts, (anyone can get them) and easy to get service, and warranty issues can be dealt with by most mechanics and any of the dealers and 5 gases emitted from the exhaust pipe there are more Yami dealers than others in the area.

Just picked up Two Bears from her winter trip thru the fix-it shop with their nice mid-winter rates. Looking at the printout of my use of my Suzuki 90 led to a discussion of outboards. The manager had just returned from a Tohatsu mechanics school. The school taught him to have 80% of running time be at high speed and the final 15 minutes should be at WOT to burn out any carbon deposits. Outboards are built to go fast, not steady. All the gas laws complaints I’ve heard on the ETec is that it carbons up when used to troll or go hull speed for any length of time.

Looking at the printout of my Suzuki at just over 1,000 hours, more than 600 hrs are at hull speed (1,800-2,100 RPM depending on boat loading, wind other variables), and just 160 hours at 4,200 RPM which is a sweet spot at about 18kts = my go-to spot for a high speed run. Almost 150 hours are under 1,000 RPM which is idling and charging the battery when electricity video bill nye at anchor overnight.

Put a 250 hp E-tec on it, the boat came alive and was a joy to run. WOT was 33 mph. I ran about 5 different props on it, main problem was it is a heavy hull and needed a VERY low pitch to get 5600 WOT rpm’s. 99% of Rosburough owners have there motors pitched way to high. And the motors are lugging, thus have no rpm response. Best prop was a Merc Enertia. Never had any cavitation or blow-out in tight turning.