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I contracted for a while at a firm based in London, but with offices all over the world. About 40,000 employees in total. I was part of the team who worked on the migration to Exchange Online because the CTO had "had enough off Exchange outages". The on-prem infrastructure was Exchange 2007 and within a short space of time of me being there, I noticed that the outages were mainly due to network issues or Server/Storage issues, both operated by separate teams and who lacked "talent". There was actually nowt wrong with the Exchange 2007 infrastructure, as in Exchange 2007 as a product seemed pretty bullet proof. However, this CTO was one of those "time for change" and "time to move forward" and so pushed for the move to O365 Exchange Online.

Once we got approx 20,000 users onto Exchange Online, the big problems then started to happen. gas under 2 dollars We had a 4 hour Exchange Online outage with this CTO in Oz spitting feathers at us "do something"…which we couldn’t. MS came back with "we’ll give you some service credits". electricity lessons ks1 Then the WAN links collapsed with BT saying "yeah, we’re looking into it". At that point 30k users were up in the cloud. I’m sure that was a 2 hour outage and we were supposed to be on the best links that money could buy. The corporate comms team were upset that they couldn’t email all internal users about the external outages. There were many outages which were either MS or BT.

We were working with a very well known 365 consultancy, who I won’t mention…but you would have heard of them. They set up the hybrid email routing using the Exchange 2007 Edge servers which caused at least 50,000 SPF email failures per day (MS recommended 2010 hub transport or Edge servers). EOP was chock full of such failures. The business really suffered because of that. Missed flights, missed deals…missed everything. But that’s not the fault of Exchange Online.

So what happened? The project was put on hold. electricity for dummies amazon We were let go. The CTO got fired. Last I heard from a permie there is some legal problems with MS because the company is now off-boarding users onto an on-prem Exchange 2013 environment and so they’re in limbo. electricity labs for middle school I was told that the costs for moving to Exchange Online massively outstripped the costs of the old Exchange 2007 environment.

I don’t mean to be stuck in the past here, but for me the jury is still out on cloud stuff. The problem is that I believe we’ve witnessed huge outages already, but due to "pride" the problem has been blamed on other things. What I’ve witnessed is the sheer panic of being unable to communicate internally when this stuff goes pop for a few hours. It’s losing communications by 100% which seemed to anger many folk.

Actually, just to add, could you imagine as an Exchange bloke, back in the on-prem days, and saying to the bosses "sorry, but we’re suffering some service degradation" and they ask "what does that mean" and you reply "don’t know"? You’d be up the road in no time. Yet today, Exchange Online suffers quite a bit from "service degradation", no-one knows until MS updates the status and no-one can find out why? Yet everyone still pays…lolz…no-one sacks MS?

I contracted for a while at a firm based in London, but with offices all over the world. About 40,000 employees in total. I was part of the team who worked on the migration to Exchange Online because the CTO had "had enough off Exchange outages". The on-prem infrastructure was Exchange 2007 and within a short space of time of me being there, I noticed that the outages were mainly due to network issues or Server/Storage issues, both operated by separate teams and who lacked "talent". There was actually nowt wrong with the Exchange 2007 infrastructure, as in Exchange 2007 as a product seemed pretty bullet proof. electricity 4th grade However, this CTO was one of those "time for change" and "time to move forward" and so pushed for the move to O365 Exchange Online.

Once we got approx 20,000 users onto Exchange Online, the big problems then started to happen. We had a 4 hour Exchange Online outage with this CTO in Oz spitting feathers at us "do something"…which we couldn’t. MS came back with "we’ll give you some service credits". Then the WAN links collapsed with BT saying "yeah, we’re looking into it". At that point 30k users were up in the cloud. gas unlimited houston I’m sure that was a 2 hour outage and we were supposed to be on the best links that money could buy. The corporate comms team were upset that they couldn’t email all internal users about the external outages. igas energy shares There were many outages which were either MS or BT.

We were working with a very well known 365 consultancy, who I won’t mention…but you would have heard of them. They set up the hybrid email routing using the Exchange 2007 Edge servers which caused at least 50,000 SPF email failures per day (MS recommended 2010 hub transport or Edge servers). EOP was chock full of such failures. The business really suffered because of that. Missed flights, missed deals…missed everything. But that’s not the fault of Exchange Online.

So what happened? The project was put on hold. We were let go. gas tax in texas The CTO got fired. Last I heard from a permie there is some legal problems with MS because the company is now off-boarding users onto an on-prem Exchange 2013 environment and so they’re in limbo. I was told that the costs for moving to Exchange Online massively outstripped the costs of the old Exchange 2007 environment.

I don’t mean to be stuck in the past here, but for me the jury is still out on cloud stuff. The problem is that I believe we’ve witnessed huge outages already, but due to "pride" the problem has been blamed on other things. What I’ve witnessed is the sheer panic of being unable to communicate internally when this stuff goes pop for a few hours. It’s losing communications by 100% which seemed to anger many folk.

Actually, just to add, could you imagine as an Exchange bloke, back in the on-prem days, and saying to the bosses "sorry, but we’re suffering some service degradation" and they ask "what does that mean" and you reply "don’t know"? You’d be up the road in no time. Yet today, Exchange Online suffers quite a bit from "service degradation", no-one knows until MS updates the status and no-one can find out why? Yet everyone still pays…lolz…no-one sacks MS?