The future of fighting cancer zapping tumors in less than a second slac national accelerator laboratory gas jokes

###########

Researchers at SLAC and Stanford are developing new accelerator-based technology that aims to speed up cancer radiation therapy by hundreds of times and make related medical devices more compact. gas and water The approach could reduce side effects in patients and possibly make radiation therapy more accessible around the world. (Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

Now, the SLAC/Stanford team has received crucial funding to proceed with two projects to develop possible treatments for tumors – one using X-rays, the other using protons. electricity lesson plans 4th grade The idea behind both is to blast cancer cells so quickly that organs and other tissues don’t have time to move during the exposure – much like taking a single freeze frame from a video. This reduces the chance that radiation will hit and damage healthy tissue around tumors, making radiation therapy more precise.

“Delivering the radiation dose of an entire therapy session with a single flash lasting less than a second would be the ultimate way of managing the constant motion of organs and tissues, and a major advance compared with methods we’re using today,” said Billy Loo, an associate professor of radiation oncology at the Stanford School of Medicine.

Sami Tantawi, a professor of particle physics and astrophysics and the chief scientist for the RF Accelerator Research Division in SLAC’s Technology Innovation Directorate, who works with Loo on both projects, said, “In order to deliver high-intensity radiation efficiently enough, we need accelerator structures that are hundreds of times more powerful than today’s technology. gas chamber The funding we received will help us build these structures.”

Proposed design of a future device for X-ray therapy, which researchers hope will be able to deliver radiation powerful enough to blast cancer cells in under a second instead of minutes. electricity magnetism and electromagnetic theory pdf The project, called PHASER, relies on novel high-power accelerator structures (shown in bronze) under development at SLAC. (Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) Blasting cancer with X-rays

In today’s medical devices, electrons fly through a tube-like accelerator structure that’s about a meter long, gaining energy from a radiofrequency field that travels through the tube at the same time and in the same direction. electricity invented or discovered The energy of the electrons then gets converted into X-rays. gas bike alley Over the past few years, the PHASER team has developed and tested accelerator prototypes with special shapes and new ways of feeding radiofrequency fields into the tube. electricity prices by country These components are already performing as predicted by simulations and pave the way for accelerator designs that support more power in a compact size.

The Stanford Department of Radiation Oncology will provide about $1 million over the next year for these efforts and support a campaign to raise more research funding. extra strength gas x while pregnant The Department of Radiation Oncology, in collaboration with the School of Medicine, has also established the Radiation Science Center focusing on precision radiation treatment. Its PHASER division, co-led by Loo and Tantawi, aims to turn the PHASER concept into a functional device.