The impossible question, when do you start to get rid of your machines – page 4 electricity review worksheet answers

###########

I’m 53 and my father passed away last year. He was an engineer who used slide rules to send men to the moon. He never owned a Bridgeport, would have liked to have one but made due with a disk sander and files. He built an airplane in our garage when I was a kid with hand tools and an O/A welder. I still have a bunch of these and doubt I’ll ever part with them or his modified Craftsman bandsaw.

The only advice I could give is whatever you want somebody to have give it to them sooner rather than later. Your body will remind you that we’re only here for a small time but it’s always possible your mind goes first. Better to get tools into the gas nozzle stuck in car hands of those who will use them now than wait for some time in the future when it will be easier….

I recently met a young guy that’s started doing 60’s style psychedelic light shows. I used to do them back in the 90’s and had bought a bunch of old projectors from Goodwill and the like. It gave me great pleasure to drop them off at his shop with the knowledge that they will most likely get used as I had intended, just maybe not by me….

And by all means don’t give up on the youth. It might seem like all they are interested in is video games but there are an awful lot of them who enjoy making things with their hands. They’re looking at Craigslist and this forum right now just z gas station waiting for you to offer that machine at a price they can afford. List it up for what it’s worth or offer. The motivated ones will ask about it and you can decide to give it away for scrap price if they seem like someone who might do some good with it.

I like the idea of mentoring someone and leaving my tools to that person… especially if family would scrap it; I want to leave each of my sons a tool box… one will be made of oak; another will be made of cherry…with hand cut dovetails and beautiful hardware… even if I have to watch hardware on ebay for 10 years for the perfect hardware… it is fun to treasure hunt.

I remember now, one of my favorite books when I was starting my young adult life… To Live, to Love, to Learn, to Leave a Legacy, (By Dr. Steven Covey). This rings true, still decades and a couple of generations later… so how can those tools be of help to the next generation? While I wouldn’t donate my tools to a makerspace that we have locally, I think using tools to capture the imagination of a younger group of machinists and giving the access to your experience could be hugely successful. I am amazed at the quality of woodworking schools across the nation and specifically in the resurgence of using hand tools. (My local makerspace is ‘geared’ to 3D Printing and has a 14×16 laser; I think they have some woodworking tools, but we have an entire shop already.)

When we were tropico 5 power plant young, I would have to go back to Fine Woodworking when we graduated from high school to refer, but there were not that many woodworking schools… now when I read the magazines and LAP’s blog they are established across the world…. Perhaps the Guilds in Europe have been continuous, but I am enjoying the observations of the craft of Woodworking here in the States.

I’m 53…And by all means don’t give up on the youth. It might seem like all they are interested in is video games but there are an awful lot of them who enjoy making things with their hands. They’re looking at Craigslist and this forum right now just waiting for you to offer that machine at a price they can afford. List it up for what it’s worth or offer. The motivated ones will ask about it and you can decide to give it away for scrap price if they seem like someone who might do some good with it.

JohnA post earlier in this thread, upset my sensibilities with a disregard for how their goods would continue producing for and cared for by younger generations. John Matthews perspective is far more like what should occur. As a mentor, I’ve seen what interaction can do. Think how many here, hung-out just to watch machine tools, woodwork, construction, maybe big brother tuning a hot rod.

I propose if you are connected to uninterested parties, you neglected engaging them when a opportunity presented itself. If the opportunity didn’t occur, you failed to create one. That thought hadn’t crossed your mind? You weren’t paying attention to advertising by outdoor sporting industry to expose youngsters to boating, fishing, hunting or whatever your interests are.

Younger generations aren’t attracted to this, because their parents weren’t either. We are sort of 3 generations out from being the masters of GNP, which means m-a-n-u-f-a-c-t-u-r-i-n-g. It’s wrong too, differentiating the little home shop, from the giant plant. Only the scale changes; similar processes, relatable vocabulary, identical theories of measurement. Used to be, any weekend garage sale had machinist tools, until manufacturing became second class. Same with internet sites, where are all the tools?

Welders and machinists starting out often aren’t making much more then minimum wages and are treated as replaceable cogs in the machine. If people aren’t getting paid livable wages, they aren’t going to be attracted to this trade. I think there’s more wrong in this country than the fact someone electricity problem in up’s parents weren’t interested. Shop classes close down and pay is depressed. Why would people do a skilled trade when they can make as much working in Starbucks?This is the primary issue. Those that want to *create* who enjoy metal working or wood working are merely picking up machinery as a hobby. When I served my Tool Die apprenticeship the woman who was in charge of hiring asked me what would bring in people. I said higher pay. She just laughed and said of course. I explained that not only was I serious, but also explained that I made $9/hr and every morning I drove by Aldi who had electricity usage calculator south africa a sign out starting wages $12.60/hr. I was 24 or 25 when I started my apprenticeship and going from $14/hr to $9/hr really hurt. Especially when I had previously been doing IT work in college part time for $17/hr. Being somewhat older, I could see the VALUE in doing the apprenticeship. However, for most 18 year olds fresh out of Highschool, it is a simple equation of cost of beer, cost of girls, cost of rent (in that order) vs wages earned.

Here’s my perspective- I’m in my mid 30’s and have been pretty mechanical my entire life. I started working building pallets at 14 and by 16 I had bought and paid for my own 10 Southbend lathe, Bridgeport mill and 250 amp MIG welder. I have done a lot of things from working in construction to 4 years in the Navy seeing the world. I have built street/strip drag cars, offroad vehicles, restored a couple old trucks and found a career path in owning a business making and selling automotive products of my design.

So when I have to choose between giving a home to a beautiful planer or a way grinder or something that says Fanuc on it which one do you think wins? There’s no way I can allocate the resources to store something with flatbelts that will never pay for the space it takes up when I can get premium manual machines with DRO’s and tooling from the 50’s through the 80’s for pocket money or high quality CNC’s from the 90’s and even early 2000’s now for less than a day’s shop labor.

I used to place an emotional value on machines and gadgets and I just don’t anymore. I’ve watched too many people waste years of their lives collecting something pointless just to lose interest and let it rot or they die and it all goes in the dumpster. Or people donate it to a museum and the museum sells it on craigslist for scrap. Or the old guys that have enormous collections of old iron and even places to put it all, but all they do is talk about it and move that stuff around every few months to pack in more deals. Those guys will tell you all about the deals they got on such a capable machine, but won’t do a damn thing with it. And if you’re a young guy starting out and ask to buy one of their deals they never use they electricity usage by country’ll waste your time. What a waste.