The philippines remains part of the usa.. page 2 alternate history discussion f gas regulations r22

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The population of the Philippines was about 16 million come WWII. by comparison, at the same time, New York, at the time the largest state, had about 13.5 million residents. the new york delegation to the house of representatives elected in 1940 (after the census whose figure I cited) had 43 representatives (out of 435), which works out to about one representative per 313,500 constituents. Using this same gas monkey monster truck ratio, the Philippines would have 51 representatives, easily making it the largest state, which would control over ten percent of the house of representatives and 9% of the electoral vote. However, since 1911, the size of the house has been fixed at 435. So what share of the house does the philippines represent? well, it contains about 10.7% of the national population, which works out to 47 seats in the house (note that, in order to accomidate this, many states will lose several seats), and again holds 9% of the electoral vote.

I’m not going to discuss the long-term effects of adding the Philippines to the united states here, either in terms of domestic politics or the philippine standard of living. But note what this represents. the philippines is, in this scenario, instantly the most powerful state in the nation, bar none. many other states will lose out, either directly (weaker house delegations) or indirectly (reduced influence) in this deal. And a few other points. the philippines population has increased since world war two by a factor gas zauberberg of 5.75, while the population of America as a whole has multiplied about 2.3 times in the same period. That sort of growth may slow, but it will at least match and probably outstrip the growth of the continental United us electricity supply voltage states for a certain period (although this may be balanced out by emigration). Another factor is that this adds a large population of people who are ethnically, religiously, and linguistically distinct from the rest of America. Finally, all of this will have to be dealt with in advance, since the US had been promising independence for decades and the philippinos werent exactly eager for america to stay (having fought a war to that effect).

In short, all of these issues have to be dealt with at some point, and probably decades before WWII (whether this would impact Japanese strategic planning is an interesting question). personally, I dont know if it would be feasible to introduce the Philippines as less than two of three states (say, Leyte, Mindanao, and a collection of central islands (Samar, leyte, Negros, Panay, palawan)).

Click to expand…Nope never been to the Philippines (would love to go though). I know English is widely spoken as a second language (with some using it as a first language). Whether or not it is fluently spoken wouldn’t alter the fact that the majority of people don’t speak it as a first language though (unless everything I’ve been reading about Filipino languages is out of date). This would still make the Philippines as a state or states unique in that upon it’s entry into the Union, English would not be the first language gas number density. I could be wrong, but I don’t think that has ever happened before in US history. Even Texas had a lot of American settlers first and likewise California I believe.

Nowadays I wouldn’t expect anyone to be talking in colloquial Spanish since it’s been over 100 years since Spain last ruled the Philippines and a lot happened inbetween. But at the time period we are basically talking about (i.e. at least a few decades before present) what would the situation have been? What was it like in the Philippines, linguistically, between 1898 and 1920? And doesn’t Tagalog have a fair amount of Spanish influence? Not saying that it is a Spanish derived k electric company duplicate bill language, but doesn’t Spanish have the most influence on it out of all the Indo-European languages?

I would imagine that in 1898 the most widely spoken languages would have been the local languages, Tagalog or it’s predecessor and Spanish (whether the normal or creole form). If a POD has to occur in the 1920s or earlier for the Philippines to become a state what are the chances that Spanish (regular or localized) would die out as quickly as it did? What are the chances that everything remains the same as in OTL education-wise?

The population of the Philippines was about 16 million come WWII. by comparison, at the same time, New York, at the time the largest state, had about 13.5 million residents. the new york delegation to the house of representatives elected in 1940 (after the census whose figure I cited) had 43 representatives (out of 435), which works electricity joules out to about one representative per 313,500 constituents. Using this same ratio, the Philippines would have 51 representatives, easily making it the largest state, which would control over ten percent of the house of representatives and 9% of the electoral vote. However, since 1911, the size of the house has been fixed at 435. So what share of the house does the philippines represent? well, it contains about 10.7% of the national population, which works out to 47 seats in the house (note that, in order to accomidate this, many states will lose several seats), and h gas l gas brennwert again holds 9% of the electoral vote.

I’m not going to discuss the long-term effects of adding the Philippines to the united states here, either in terms of domestic politics or the philippine standard of living. But note what this represents. the philippines is, in this scenario, instantly the most powerful state in the nation, bar none. many other states will lose out, either directly (weaker house delegations) or indirectly (reduced influence) in this deal. And a few other points. the philippines population has increased since world war two by a factor of 5.75, while the population of America as a whole has multiplied about 2.3 times in the same period. That sort of growth may slow, but it will at least match and probably outstrip the growth of the continental United states for a certain period (although this may be balanced out by emigration). Another factor is that this adds a large population of people who are ethnically, religiously, and linguistically distinct from the rest of America. Finally, all of this will have to be dealt with in advance, since the US had been promising independence for decades and the philippinos werent exactly eager for america to stay (having fought a war to that effect).

In short, all of these issues have to be dealt with at some point, and probably decades before WWII (whether this would impact Japanese strategic planning is an interesting question). personally, I dont know if it would be feasible to introduce the Philippines as less than two of three states (say, Leyte, Mindanao, and a collection of central gas unlimited sugar land tx islands (Samar, leyte, Negros, Panay, palawan)).

Nope never been to the Philippines (would love to go though). I know English is widely spoken as a second language (with some using it as a first language). Whether or not it is fluently spoken wouldn’t alter the fact that the majority of people don’t speak it as a first language though (unless everything I’ve been reading about Filipino languages is out of date). This would still make the Philippines as a state or states unique in that upon it’s entry into the gas 93 Union, English would not be the first language. I could be wrong, but I don’t think that has ever happened before in US history. Even Texas had a lot of American settlers first and likewise California I believe.

Nowadays I wouldn’t expect anyone to be talking in colloquial Spanish since it’s been over 100 years since Spain last ruled the Philippines and a lot happened inbetween. But at the time period we are basically talking about (i.e. at least a few decades before present) what would the situation have been? What was it like in the Philippines, linguistically, between 1898 and 1920? And doesn power usage estimator’t Tagalog have a fair amount of Spanish influence? Not saying that it is a Spanish derived language, but doesn’t Spanish have the most influence on it out of all the Indo-European languages?

I would imagine that in 1898 the most widely spoken languages would have been the local languages, Tagalog or it’s predecessor and Spanish (whether the normal or creole form). If a POD has to occur in the 1920s or earlier for the Philippines to become a state what are the chances that Spanish (regular or localized) would die out as quickly as it did? What are the chances that everything remains the same as in OTL education-wise?