Tom clark that glow in the pink church william carlos williams lines (3 poems) caution bees satisfaction guilt (hey old feller) gas utility cost

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Jabalia Photo @mohmdabed #AFP: image via Frédérique Geffard @fgeffardAFP, 27 April 2018 A Palestinian woman stands behind burning tyres in Khuza’a near the border in southern #Gaza Strip. By: Hosam Salem: image via Hosam salem @Hosam Sale mG, 27 April 2018 Relatives of Palesti nian Tahrir Wahba, 18, mourn during his f uneral in Khan Yunis in #Gaza. Wahaba was wounded with a shot in the head by #Israeli fire in a clash on April 6 and was pronounced dead today.: image via said khatib @saudkhatib, 23 April 20 2 18 Relatives of Palesti nian Tahrir Wahba, 18, mourn during his f uneral in Khan Yunis in #Gaza. Wahaba was wounded with a shot in the head by #Israeli fire in a clash on April 6 and was pronounced dead today.: image via said khatib @saudkhatib, 23 April 20 18 Relatives of Palesti nian Tahrir Wahba, 18, mourn during his f uneral in Khan Yunis in #Gaza. Wahaba was wounded with a shot in the head by #Israeli fire in a clash on April 6 and was pronounced dead today.: image via said khatib @saudkhatib, 23 April 20 18 Relatives of Palesti nian Tahrir Wahba, 18, mourn during his f uneral in Khan Yunis in #Gaza. Wahaba was wounded with a shot in the head by #Israeli fire in a clash on April 6 and was pronounced dead today.: image via said khatib @saudkhatib, 23 April 20 18

Bob Feller, who came off an Iowa farm with a dazzling fastball that made him a national celebrity at 17 and propelled him to the Hall of Fame as one of baseball’s greatest pitchers, died on Wednesday in Cleveland, where he had played for the Indians for 18 years. He was 92.

Joining the Indians in 1936, Feller became baseball’s biggest draw since Babe Ruth, throwing pitches that batters could barely see — fastballs approaching 100 miles an hour and curveballs and sinkers that fooled the sharpest eyes. He was Rapid Robert in the sports pages. As Yankees pitcher Lefty Gomez was said to have remarked after three Feller pitches blew by him, “That last one sounded a little low.”

By the end of his brief rookie season, Feller was the best-known young person in America, with the possible exception of Shirley Temple. When he returned for his senior year at Van Meter High School, the governor of Iowa attended a welcome-home ceremony. When the 1937 season opened, Feller’s picture was on the cover of Time magazine. And when he graduated from high school in June of that year (he had been tutored while on road trips), NBC Radio carried the ceremony nationwide.

Feller’s career predated the use of radar guns to measure a pitch’s speed, but he was nonetheless able to show exactly how fast he was in a demonstration in August 1946, when he threw 30 pitches through the hole of a photoelectric device before a game in Washington. They averaged 98.6 miles an hour.

We’ll take this as an unintended wedding gift from 45 years ago today. At 2:00 pm this afternoon, Me and the Mrs. will be watching our grandson pitch behind the church where precisely at that hour in 1973 we were inducted into the Hall of Mirrors. Hey, a feller and his gal can only try to do what they can do. "Hey, batta-batta…"

Thanks Tom, putting together those little known poems by Bill Williams followed by Milton (maybe a first pairing?!?) and those beautiful Mojave photos followed by (unfolding into) all those other photos including the ones of Rapid Robert Feller . . . "That last one sounded a little low" . . . and your "slipstream blankness Of the white page"

Steve thanks very much for knowing how little known those wcw poems are. The little "Lines" is one he kept fiddling with for some years. I take it to be one of his personal practise pieces… as in a few easy pieces will do, if you do them over and over… sometimes improve sometimes ruin… always learning. Anyhow the version he published in boke form is surprisingly different. Revision not always improvement.

However even had such an example existed and had he known of such an example his common sense not to mention professional economy would probably have told him he was never going to have not only the time but more importantly the staying power/stamina for a daily formal practise of that order. Physically I mean. Nobody (except you) does! Not that it would ever have occurred to him. In the first place. And why would it.