Tompkinssquare.com gas tracker

#####

Power’s self-titled debut, released on Tompkins Square in 2016, received wide praise from UNCUT (9/10, “Masterpiece”), MOJO (4 stars), The Guardian (4 stars), Irish Times (4 stars) and was featured on NPR World Cafe, as well as several BBC programs.

The sadly topical first single, “Don’t Shut Me Up (Politely)”, seems to express what’s on the minds of many women right now. Tompkins Square’s Josh Rosenthal noted on social media, “I don’t usually have the opportunity to say something political about the music I put out, but in the case of Brigid Mae Power’s new single, I think this song may resonate with any woman who’s been gaslit, mansplained to, paid less, bullied, sexually harassed by a C-List celebrity or famous movie producer, had her birth control systematically taken away, or told she had to go to another country or across state lines to get an abortion.”

Most of these songs were written in the last year in Ireland and they’re all about the different feelings I had at the time. Last year I moved back to Galway, Ireland where I mostly grew up and I was feeling and noticing again the repressive and oppressive environment. So I revisited a song I had half written a few years previous called ‘Don’t Shut Me Up (Politely)’ and I found that moving home, I had the ammunition to finish it. I had actually tried to record this song in Portland, Oregon the previous year but at the time it just did not work. It was the wrong atmosphere, it was summer and a sunny day and just was not repressive enough in the way that it can be here! So I didn’t really feel real singing it as I didn’t feel held back at all! It felt like singing to a brick wall and it wasn’t going anywhere… So when I moved back I had the idea to go up to an analogue studio in the North of Ireland and specifically record that song there, so we booked in some time at the studio and I hurried to finish some other scraps of songs I had lying around with the idea of recording them live and just seeing what happened.

I had been thinking about my Grandmother a lot, so there are a couple of songs about her.. I’d been thinking about lost friendships. I’d been thinking about how to balance being settled and also being up in the clouds. I’d been thinking a lot about cutting out the crap and letting go of things that don’t serve you, so I feel like these songs are pretty direct. I wanted them to sound direct too and the studio Analogue Catalogue was the perfect place and had a great sound and live room…. When we went up there the second time to record the other batch of songs, it was a very busy time in our life and I hadn’t finished writing the lyrics to a lot of them. Not as a choice – I just literally didn’t have time. So when we got there I thought I would just try them out anyway and as a natural procrastinator I was much happier with the sound of the result of being pushed to the last minute. Peter added in different instruments really naturally and then mixed and mastered the record. ‘I’m Grateful’ was written in Oregon and for me I can tell that it wasn’t written in Ireland. The rest of the album feels quite like what my environment looks like here at the moment out of my window.

Tompkins Square is proud to announce the release of ‘Sonny Clark Trio : The 1960 Time Sessions’. The limited edition 2LP vinyl set will be available exclusively via participating independent record stores as part of Record Store Day on Black Friday, November 24th, 2017.

Sonny Clark’s reputation as one of the finest jazz pianists of his era has grown in recent years, with many folks rediscovering his classic Blue Note recordings like ‘Cool Struttin’, ‘Dial ‘S’ for Sonny’, ‘Leapin’ and Lopin’, as well as session work with Lee Morgan, Grant Green and others. Cut down by heroin addiction at age 31 in 1961, Clark’s legacy continues to expand.

The Time sessions were produced by the late Bob Shad, owner of Time and Mainstream Records. The reissue includes the original Time album re-mastered from the original tapes by Dave Donnelly, plus an extra disc of alternate takes previously unavailable on vinyl. Nat Hentoff wrote the original liner notes, included in the reissue package, and former New York Times critic Ben Ratliff contributes a new 3500-word essay. The set was produced for reissue by Mia Apatow (Time Records) and Josh Rosenthal (Tompkins Square).

Recorded in San Antonio, Gallivantin’ shows Beeley’s heartfelt, folky side – a wistful set of original tunes, plus a cover of Bob Dylan’s “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere” and a spaced-out, 10 minute+ Eastern-influenced psych take on Buffy Sainte-Marie’s “Little Wheel Spin And Spin / Co’Dine”.

Recorded in Jackson, Mississippi, Passing Dream reveals the shifting musical direction of opposite sides of the 70’s – a tougher, huskier, more alt-country sound emerging, presaging modern day troubadours like Chris Stapleton and Jamey Johnson. Released by Malaco Records in 1979, the album features the very first studio credit by guitarist Larry Campbell (Bob Dylan, Levon Helm), along with drummer James Stroud (Marshall Tucker Band, Eddie Rabbitt), keyboardist Carson Whitsett (Paul Simon, Tony Joe White) and other crack studio players.

Now a truck driver living in New Mexico, Will Beeley recently recorded his first new album since 1979’s Passing Dream. Produced by Jerry David DeCicca of The Black Swans (who also produced Larry Jon Wilson’s final album), the new one features Michael Guerra (The Mavericks), and is mixed by Stuart Sikes (Loretta Lynn’s Van Lear Rose, Cat Power’s The Greatest). The album is slated for release on Tompkins Square sometime in 2018.