Top tips for poison ivy earth earthsky electricity in india

Top tips for sufferers. Some individuals are more profoundly allergic to urushiol than other, and the degree of reaction can change over time. The rash and blistering caused by the toxic oil is slowest to develop after the first exposure. During subsequent interactions with itchy plants, the body freaks out faster.

A number of people seem keen on the idea of building up a tolerance to urushiol so that they can march through poisonous flora with impunity. This isn’t complete insanity. Dermatological experiments on humans have demonstrated some success with this kind of desensitization, though the benefits weren’t always long lasting. However, do note that such studies were done under controlled conditions, using intramuscular injections of urushiol or pills designed to protect the digestive tract from the chemical’s full assault. Should you go out and eat a fistful of poison ivy to see if you can approximate their results on your own? I think you know the answer to that question (hint: it’s NO).

Contrary to popular belief, poison ivy/oak/sumac isn’t contagious, nor does it spread to other parts of your body (though it may seem like it does because the rash takes time to fully materialize). The only way it can be transmitted is through contact with the oil itself, so if you find yourself afflicted with the rash it’s important to track down every last trace of urushiol.

Symptom-wise, you can sooth the itching with the old Leiber/Stoller ocean-of-calamine-lotion remedy. But you might fare a bit better with an estuary of corticosteroid cream and perhaps a small pond of antihistamines, both of which also help reduce the inflammation.

If you’re especially fed up with these sadistic plants, you can also try moving to Alaska or Hawaii, both of which are Toxicodendron-free. However, you may just be trading in contact dermatitis for bigger problems like bears and volcanoes. So at least wait for the swelling to subside before making any rash decisions.

Top tips for sufferers. Some individuals are more profoundly allergic to urushiol than other, and the degree of reaction can change over time. The rash and blistering caused by the toxic oil is slowest to develop after the first exposure. During subsequent interactions with itchy plants, the body freaks out faster.

A number of people seem keen on the idea of building up a tolerance to urushiol so that they can march through poisonous flora with impunity. This isn’t complete insanity. Dermatological experiments on humans have demonstrated some success with this kind of desensitization, though the benefits weren’t always long lasting. However, do note that such studies were done under controlled conditions, using intramuscular injections of urushiol or pills designed to protect the digestive tract from the chemical’s full assault. Should you go out and eat a fistful of poison ivy to see if you can approximate their results on your own? I think you know the answer to that question (hint: it’s NO).

Contrary to popular belief, poison ivy/oak/sumac isn’t contagious, nor does it spread to other parts of your body (though it may seem like it does because the rash takes time to fully materialize). The only way it can be transmitted is through contact with the oil itself, so if you find yourself afflicted with the rash it’s important to track down every last trace of urushiol.

Symptom-wise, you can sooth the itching with the old Leiber/Stoller ocean-of-calamine-lotion remedy. But you might fare a bit better with an estuary of corticosteroid cream and perhaps a small pond of antihistamines, both of which also help reduce the inflammation.

If you’re especially fed up with these sadistic plants, you can also try moving to Alaska or Hawaii, both of which are Toxicodendron-free. However, you may just be trading in contact dermatitis for bigger problems like bears and volcanoes. So at least wait for the swelling to subside before making any rash decisions.