Tranylcypromine – side effects, dosage, interactions – drugs – everyday health 5 gases emitted from the exhaust pipe

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Tranylcypromine is used to treat major depressive episode in adults. This medication is usually given after other anti-depressants have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms. Tranylcypromine will not treat bipolar disorder (manic depression).

There are many other drugs that can cause serious medical problems if you take them together with tranylcypromine. Do not take tranylcypromine before telling your doctor about all other prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Call your doctor at once if you have any new or worsening symptoms such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

While you are taking tranylcypromine, you must not drink alcohol or eat foods that are high in tyramine, listed in the "What should I avoid while taking tranylcypromine?" section of this leaflet. Eating tyramine while you are taking tranylcypromine can raise your blood pressure to dangerous levels, causing life-threatening symptoms such as sudden and severe headache, confusion, blurred vision, problems with speech or balance, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, seizure (convulsions), and sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body). Call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms.

Do not use this medication if you have used another MAOI such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take tranylcypromine before another MAOI has cleared from your body. If you are switching to tranylcypromine from another MAOI, your doctor may start you at a low dose.

• an antidepressant;• blood pressure medicine such as guanethidine (Ismelin), methyldopa (Aldomet), and reserpine;• diet pills, stimulants, ADHD medications, over-the-counter cough and cold or allergy medicines;• doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan);• carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol);• cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril);• maprotiline (Ludiomil);• procarbazine (Matulane);• bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban);• venlafaxine (Effexor);• buspirone (BuSpar);• tryptophan (also called L-tryptophan);• levodopa (Larodopa, Parcopa, Sinemet); or• meperidine (Demerol, Mepergan).

You may have thoughts about suicide while taking an antidepressant, especially if you are younger than 24 years old. Tell your doctor if you have worsening depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

Tranylcypromine may be habit forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share tranylcypromine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

• avocados, bananas, figs, raisins, and sauerkraut;• beef or chicken liver, fish, meats prepared with tenderizer, bologna, pepperoni, salami, summer sausage, game meat, meat extracts, caviar, dried fish, herring, and shrimp paste;• beer (alcoholic and nonalcoholic), red wine (especially Chianti), sherry, vermouth, and other distilled spirits;• caffeine (including coffee, tea, cola); and• cheeses, including American, blue, boursault, brick, brie, camembert, cheddar, emmenthaler, gruyere, mozzarella, parmesan, romano, roquefort, stilton, and Swiss;• chocolate;• ginseng;• sour cream and yogurt;• soy sauce, miso soup, bean curd, fava beans; or• yeast extracts.

There are many other drugs that can cause serious medical problems if you take them together with tranylcypromine. Do not take tranylcypromine before telling your doctor about all other prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.

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