Tucson electric power company private company information – bloomberg gas refrigerator not cooling

Tucson Electric Power Company, a regulated electric utility company, generates, transmits, and distributes electricity in Arizona. It generates electricity through coal, natural gas, wind, and solar generation resources. The company serves approximately 422,000 retail customers covering an area of 1,155 square mile in Pima and Cochise County. As of December 31, 2017, it had approximately 2,175 miles of transmission lines; 7,642 miles of distribution lines; and 2,531 megawatts of nominal generating capacity. The company also sells electricity and provides transmission and ancillary services to other utilities, municipalities, and energy marketing companies. It serves residential, commercial, …

Tucson Electric Power Company, a regulated electric utility company, generates, transmits, and distributes electricity in Arizona. It generates electricity through coal, natural gas, wind, and solar generation resources. The company serves approximately 422,000 retail customers covering an area of 1,155 square mile in Pima and Cochise County. As of December 31, 2017, it had approximately 2,175 miles of transmission lines; 7,642 miles of distribution lines; and 2,531 megawatts of nominal generating capacity. The company also sells electricity and provides transmission and ancillary services to other utilities, municipalities, and energy marketing companies. It serves residential, commercial, and public sector customers, as well as various industries, such as copper mining, cement manufacturing, defense, health care, education, military bases, and other governmental entities. The company was founded in 1892 and is based in Tucson, Arizona. Tucson Electric Power Company is a subsidiary of UNS Energy Corporation.

Tucson Electric Power Co. plans to reduce its reliance on coal-fired generation by investing in renewable energy projects to satisfy the future energy needs of its customers. The company outlined plans to develop a "more responsive, sustainable resource portfolio" in the 2017 integrated resource plan the utility filed with the Arizona Corporation Commission. Those plans include adding 800 MW of renewable capacity and delivering at least 30% of its power from renewable resources by 2030, which is twice the level required through 2025 under Arizona’s renewable energy standard. The utility plans to add 100 MW of energy storage systems to boost power output levels faster than conventional generating resources and to maintain the energy demand and supply requirement. When Unit 2 at the San Juan plant in New Mexico is shut down at the end of 2017, Tucson Electric will lose 170 MW of coal-fired capacity. The company anticipates losing another 170 MW of coal-fired capacity when the current coal supply agreement ends in June 2022, and the utility plans to stop using the plant entirely. Tucson Electric is also preparing for the retirement of the coal-fired Navajo generating station, scheduled to run through December 2019 if a land lease extension is reached. The company owns 7.5%, or 168 MW, in the facility and has joined other owners in working with the Navajo Nation to develop a transition plan for the facility.