Unplug your refrigerator at night to save electricity – page 2 – ar15.com gas up shawty

#

No it won’t spoil in that time,but it will for damn sure not keep as well or as long with 6-10 degree temp swings. Say, 40,(where some microbial activity is taking place, else your milk would not sour and your cheese grow moldy, and your leftevers never become Chia pets in a Takealong), to 47 degrees, where an exponentially greater amount of microbial activity will take place.

An argument could be made for a freezer, as all biological activity is stopped below about 30F. Freezer spoilage is a mechanical process, not biological. Most home freezers are set around ~0F, and reefer trucks hauling frozen consider it unsalable if it ever gets above 20F when tested at 4-6 points at random points on a pallet.

However, two things negate the argument.The heat has to be removed, regardless. All you are doing is making it less efficient, because when you plug your freezer back in, it will have to run for however long it takes to get back to the set temperature. The same amount of thermal energy must be displaced, whether in small amounts that maintain a steady temp, or in one giant cycle of gradually decreasing efficiency as the temp differential increases. On the whole, the former is at least as efficient, because the compressor itself is not optimized for long extended cycles. In the latter, the difference is likely insignificant, and negated by greater destruction of food quality.

Not saying it’s not a ridiculous idea to keep plugging and unplugging your fridge. but will food spoil that quickly? I thought refrigerators were more insulated than that.No it won’t spoil in that time,but it will for damn sure not keep as well or as long with 6-10 degree temp swings. Say, 40,(where some microbial activity is taking place, else your milk would not sour and your cheese grow moldy, and your leftevers never become Chia pets in a Takealong), to 47 degrees, where an exponentially greater amount of microbial activity will take place.

An argument could be made for a freezer, as all biological activity is stopped below about 30F. Freezer spoilage is a mechanical process, not biological. Most home freezers are set around ~0F, and reefer trucks hauling frozen consider it unsalable if it ever gets above 20F when tested at 4-6 points at random points on a pallet.

However, two things negate the argument.The heat has to be removed, regardless. All you are doing is making it less efficient, because when you plug your freezer back in, it will have to run for however long it takes to get back to the set temperature. The same amount of thermal energy must be displaced, whether in small amounts that maintain a steady temp, or in one giant cycle of gradually decreasing efficiency as the temp differential increases. On the whole, the former is at least as efficient, because the compressor itself is not optimized for long extended cycles. In the latter, the difference is likely insignificant, and negated by greater destruction of food quality.

I remember reading an article on how to easily save energy. It said that reducing the temperature you heat your home to by two degrees would save you (ridiculously small amount of money). When I read that, my reaction was that for (ridiculously small amount of money), I’d prefer to be comfortable since two degrees (say going from 68 to 70) would make a big difference in comfort.I have a programmable thermostat, with the temp set the same at all times, the way I like it. As with the refrigerator, the money you save by letting your house get warm or cold is going to be spent when the system has to work to return the temp to what it was. The better your insulation, the less sense it makes.My father had a fancy programmable thermostat. He would run the temp way down at night, just before he went to bed, in order to save electricity. He tended to be impatient, so he let the air conditioning kick in to drop the temperature that much quicker.

I found out about this during an extended power outage, because the generator that was providing power for both our houses (heat was propane on both) was not large enough to run his air conditioner, and his ‘energy saving’ temperature adjustment had me running around to find out why the generator bogged down and the lights got dim.