Val-l-domesticviolence-0522 gas exchange in the lungs

Thanks to McClellin’s crusade and Assemblyman Jim Frazier’s AB 643 — instruction on how to recognize early warning signs of adolescent relationship abuse and intimate partner violence — is law, implemented into already-mandated health instruction for ninth graders starting this next school year.

“This is an important issue that, unfortunately, has an impact on many young people,” Clark said. “We will examine our own curriculum and look at other state-adopted health curriculum that covers these complex topics. We have provided training to all staff in regards to human trafficking and this training will need to be provided to secondary educators who teach health-related courses.”

“Education and awareness is a key part of breaking the generational cycle of domestic violence,” Horton said. “Children, armed with knowledge, can make their own decisions as to how they want to live their lives and how they want to treat their future loved ones, despite what they experience growing up. Knowledge is power and power can release one from becoming a victim of circumstances.”

There was no apparent abuse before the fatal shooting, McClellin said. But there were subtle indicators. The boyfriend wouldn’t let Jacobson wear nail polish “because it was too sexy.” And when she was out without him, he would call numerous times to check up on her. He even had Jacobson followed.

The boyfriend was eventually convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to 24 years to life. His parole comes up every 18 months and it was at one hearing that McClellin decided to crusade for domestic violence curriculum in the schools.

“We need to teach kids the warning signs,” McClellin said, including the signs that their own parents are in an abusive relationship. “If that’s all you know and that’s your world, you might not know the difference. I wanted to reach the kids that are seeing it at home and reach kids like my sister who just didn’t know the warning signs.”

Now comes the challenge of creating the curriculum and training educators. McClellin would also like law enforcement to get involved, perhaps included into instruction and warning “of what the consequences would be” for any abuser, she said.

“I remember talking to Sonia after each stage that it (the bill) passed,” Crosson said. “I told her to be prepared for it to not pass, but that she could try again. But every time it came to the next level then the next level, it kept passing. And when they asked her to speak, she nailed it.”

Thanks to McClellin’s crusade and Assemblyman Jim Frazier’s AB 643 — instruction on how to recognize early warning signs of adolescent relationship abuse and intimate partner violence — is law, implemented into already-mandated health instruction for ninth graders starting this next school year.

“This is an important issue that, unfortunately, has an impact on many young people,” Clark said. “We will examine our own curriculum and look at other state-adopted health curriculum that covers these complex topics. We have provided training to all staff in regards to human trafficking and this training will need to be provided to secondary educators who teach health-related courses.”

“Education and awareness is a key part of breaking the generational cycle of domestic violence,” Horton said. “Children, armed with knowledge, can make their own decisions as to how they want to live their lives and how they want to treat their future loved ones, despite what they experience growing up. Knowledge is power and power can release one from becoming a victim of circumstances.”

There was no apparent abuse before the fatal shooting, McClellin said. But there were subtle indicators. The boyfriend wouldn’t let Jacobson wear nail polish “because it was too sexy.” And when she was out without him, he would call numerous times to check up on her. He even had Jacobson followed.

The boyfriend was eventually convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to 24 years to life. His parole comes up every 18 months and it was at one hearing that McClellin decided to crusade for domestic violence curriculum in the schools.

“We need to teach kids the warning signs,” McClellin said, including the signs that their own parents are in an abusive relationship. “If that’s all you know and that’s your world, you might not know the difference. I wanted to reach the kids that are seeing it at home and reach kids like my sister who just didn’t know the warning signs.”

Now comes the challenge of creating the curriculum and training educators. McClellin would also like law enforcement to get involved, perhaps included into instruction and warning “of what the consequences would be” for any abuser, she said.

“I remember talking to Sonia after each stage that it (the bill) passed,” Crosson said. “I told her to be prepared for it to not pass, but that she could try again. But every time it came to the next level then the next level, it kept passing. And when they asked her to speak, she nailed it.”