Varicose veins and spider veins womenshealth.gov gasbuddy diesel

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• Sclerotherapy. Sclerotherapy is the most common treatment for smaller varicose veins and spider veins. The doctor injects a chemical into the vein. The chemical causes the vein walls to swell, stick together, and seal shut. This stops the flow of blood, and the vein turns into scar tissue. Your doctor or nurse may suggest that you wear gradient compression stockings after sclerotherapy to help with healing. In a few weeks, the vein should fade. You may need multiple treatments for it to work. There is also a chance that varicose veins or spider veins may come back.

• Percutaneous (skin surface) laser treatments. Laser treatments can treat spider electricity office near me veins and varicose veins that are smaller than 3 millimeters in diameter (about a 10th of an inch). This procedure sends very strong bursts of light through the skin onto the vein. This makes the vein slowly fade and disappear. You may need several treatments to close spider veins in the legs. There is a chance that varicose veins or spider veins may come back.

• Endovenous thermal therapy (laser and radiofrequency ablation). This procedure treats the larger bulging surface veins of the legs. During the procedure, the doctor inserts a small tube into the vein. The doctor places a small probe through the tube. A device at the tip of the probe heats up the inside of the vein and closes it off. The device uses radio waves or laser energy to seal k gas constant the vein permanently. Healthy veins around the sealed vein take over the normal flow of blood.

[tooltiptop title=VAIR-ih-kohs]Varicose[/tooltiptop] veins and spider veins are swollen, twisted veins that usually appear on the legs. Women are more likely to have varicose veins and spider veins. Pregnancy, older age electricity pictures information, and obesity can increase your risk of varicose veins and spider veins. Varicose veins and spider veins are often painless and do not usually cause health problems. If they do cause symptoms, or if you want to have them removed, talk to your doctor or nurse about treatment options. What are varicose veins?

Your heart pumps blood filled with oxygen and nutrients through your arteries to your whole body. Veins then carry the blood from different parts of your body back to your heart. Normally, your veins have valves that act as one-way flaps. But, if the valves don’t close correctly, blood can leak back into the lower part of the vein rather than going toward the heart. Over time, more blood gets stuck in the vein, building pressure that weakens the walls of the vein. This causes the vein to grow larger. Are some women more at risk static electricity zapper of varicose veins and spider veins?

• Are pregnant. During pregnancy, the amount of blood pumping through your body increases to support your unborn baby. The extra blood causes your veins to swell. Your growing uterus (womb) also puts pressure on your veins. Varicose veins may go away within a few months after childbirth, or they may remain and continue to cause symptoms. More varicose veins and spider veins may appear with each additional pregnancy.

• Use hormonal birth control or menopausal hormone therapy . The hormone estrogen may weaken vein valves and lead to varicose veins. Using hormonal birth control, including the pill or a patch, shot, vaginal ring, or intrauterine device (IUD), with estrogen and progesterone, or taking menopausal hormone therapy, may raise your risk of varicose or spider veins. 6,7

• Venogram. Your doctor or nurse may do this test to get a closer look at blood flow through your veins. A venogram is a type of X-ray that uses a dye (called a contrast) to help your doctor or nurse see the electricity quiz ks2 veins in your legs. A venogram is a type of angiogram, a test often used in heart disease. This test is used only if your doctor or nurse thinks you may have a large blood clot.

• If your symptoms are mild, your doctor or nurse may suggest steps to take at home. Your doctor or nurse may also suggest compression stockings to wear daily and remove at night to make blood flow better in your legs. These steps may help you manage symptoms of existing varicose veins and spider veins. They can also help prevent new varicose electricity projects for high school students veins and spider veins from forming.

Maybe. Some treatments for varicose veins seal off or remove the vein permanently. But, over time, new varicose veins or spider veins can develop. You can’t control some risk factors for varicose veins and spider veins, like your age and family history. If you get new varicose veins or spider veins, you may 4 gas laws need to have a surgery or medical procedure again to remove them or block them off.

• Prescription-strength gradient compression hose, which offer the greatest amount of pressure to the feet, ankles, and lower legs. You may need a prescription from your doctor to buy them, especially if your insurance plan covers it. You will also need to be fitted by someone who has been trained to do this. These hose are sold in medical supply stores and some drugstores.

Some stronger compression stockings can hurt people with certain medical conditions, such as certain types of heart disease or heart failure. Ask your doctor or nurse if it’s safe for you to use prescription-strength compression stockings or what strength would be safe for you. What else can I do to treat varicose veins and spider veins without having surgery?

• Sclerotherapy. Sclerotherapy is the most common treatment for smaller varicose veins and spider veins. The doctor injects a chemical into the vein. The chemical causes the vein walls to swell locate a gas station near me, stick together, and seal shut. This stops the flow of blood, and the vein turns into scar tissue. Your doctor or nurse may suggest that you wear gradient compression stockings after sclerotherapy to help with healing. In a few weeks, the vein should fade. You may need multiple treatments for it to work. There is also a chance that varicose veins or spider veins may come back.

• Percutaneous (skin surface) laser treatments. Laser treatments can treat spider veins and varicose veins that are smaller than 3 millimeters in diameter (about a 10th of an inch). This procedure sends very strong bursts of light through the skin onto the vein. This makes the vein slowly fade and disappear. You may need several treatments to close spider veins in the legs. There is a chance that varicose veins or spider veins may come back.

• Endovenous thermal therapy (laser and radiofrequency ablation). This procedure treats the larger bulging surface veins of the legs. During the procedure, the doctor inserts a small tube into the vein. The doctor places a small probe through the tube. A device at the electricity notes physics tip of the probe heats up the inside of the vein and closes it off. The device uses radio waves or laser energy to seal the vein permanently. Healthy veins around the sealed vein take over the normal flow of blood.

• Ambulatory phlebectomy. This surgery removes varicose veins that are just beneath the skin’s surface. The doctor makes tiny cuts in the skin and uses hooks to pull the vein out of the leg. The doctor usually removes the vein in one treatment and leaves only tiny scars. Many people can return to normal activity the day after treatment. Healthy veins will then take over the normal flow of blood.

• Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , or blood clots in veins that are deeper under the skin. You may not have any signs or symptoms of DVT, or the blood clot may cause pain, swelling, warmth, and a pulling feeling in the 2015 electricity rates calf. Sitting still for a long time, such as when you are traveling more than 8 hours, may increase your risk of a blood clot. The blood clot can then break off and travel to the lungs. It can cause a blockage in the lungs, called a pulmonary embolism, that makes it difficult to breathe, speeds up your heartbeat, and causes chest pain. It can also lead to death. You can help prevent blood clots during long airplane flights, for example, by wearing compression stockings, staying hydrated, and moving around regularly.

• Gloviczki, P., Comerota, A. J., Dalsing, M. C., Eklof, B. G., Gillespie, D. L, Gloviczki, M., … Wakefield, T. W. (2011). The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: Clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and npower electricity supplier number the American Venous Forum. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 53(5), 2S–48S.