Video 10 most irritating things about kenyans from diaspora – kenya satellite news network c gastronomie brignais

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These Diaspora guys come and shortly forgot they called ‘ngata’ petrol. They call it gas and thus have to go to a gas station… supermarkets are convenience stores. And they will ask whether you moved houses to a ‘Condo’… and when you zubaa whether they meant ‘kondoo’ they correct that it’s ‘condominium’ back in Delaware…which is a Shagz like mid Atlantic State equivalent to Ruiru in Kenya. And by the way, nobody gives a rat’s butt what you call things in the US!

These are nincompoops who used to get the ‘disk’ for not speaking proper English or Swahili and always translated English from vernacular when talking during the Kibaki presidency. But now they proudly brag through their noses that “I only speak Luhya and Swa kidogo!”

Yes, we know Kamande the butcher handles money, and still uses the same hands to roast mutura. But we have been eating his food since we got our first jobs and nothing has ever happened…apart from an occasional stomach ache that Vodka quickly cured. But when these Diaspora charlatans come everything has cholera!

In a scathing audio message from Canada on Sunday, Mr Miguna also poked holes in the unity deal between Mr Odinga and President Uhuru Kenyatta, saying it is only a matter of time before it collapses, given the history of “shared cynicism” the two have towards the citizenry.

However, it is his outrage against Mr Odinga, who last week accused the fiery lawyer of being his own worst enemy, that is likely to stoke the political fires even more. Mr Miguna accused the former prime minister of political dictatorship and intolerance, and building “an edifice of political impunity within ODM where his word is like a fiat, or even the 10 commandments of God”.

“He does not want a system that would encourage ability, merit and integrity to be the foundations of leadership,” said Mr Miguna, his apparent disdain for the opposition leader made worse by Mr Odinga’s assertion in London last week that he (Mr Miguna) had refused to cooperate with Immigration officials when he was deported from the country for the second time in March.

According to timelines drawn by the United Nations Security Council, the planned withdrawal comes seven years after KDF troops entered Somalia on October 14, 2011 in pursuit of Al Shabaab terrorists who were entering Kenya at will to abduct and kill aid workers and tourists in North Eastern and Coast provinces.

If the program works as planned, by December 2020 all sixteen Forward Operating Base (FOB) occupied by KDF troops working under Amisom will be taken over by Somalia National Army (SNA) and Jubaland Security Force who are currently being mentored to take over security responsibility of their country. The FOBs include Amisom Sector II headquarters Dhobley, Afmadhow, Tabda, Fafadun, Hoosingow, Kismayo New Airport, Kismayo Old Airport, Kolbio, Buale, Badhaadhe, Beles Qoqaani and Burgavo among others.

Last year, Kenya withdrew 200 troops from Amisom as part of its share in the 1,000-man strong force in the drawdown authorized by the UN Security Council. Another 200 KDF troops are scheduled to withdrawn from Somalia by December. It is expected that the withdrawal will be escalated ahead of the 2020 deadline leaving all security responsibilities to Somalia security agencies.

The five Troop Contributing Countries (TCCs) namely Burundi, Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda and Ethiopia are bound by the UN Security Council drawdown resolution. Kenya, Uganda, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Zambia are contributing police officers to Amisom. However, the Special Representative of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission ambassador Francisco Caetano says the number will be compensated by 500 Amisom police who are coming in to assist in training of Somali police officers.

According to the UN Security Council Resolution 2372 (2017) which extended Amisom’s mandate until May 31, there is an expected reduction of the troops from 21,626 to 20,626 by October 30. The Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2372 (2017) under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter in which there would be a reduction of uniformed personnel but an increase of police in Somalia.

However, locals and TCC are apprehensive of the ability of SNA to hold on to territory liberated by African Union troops when they withdraw in 2020. Lack of a unified command structure for the SNA and other security forces operating in Somalia is the greatest challenge to achieving a realistic transition to and handing over of security responsibility.