Vote leave faces scrutiny over £50m football contest uk progressive gas x strips instructions

####

Now it has emerged that a data set referred to by Facebook, called “50million_remains”, is likely to be a competition that Vote Leave ran, in which it offered fans the chance to win £50m if they correctly predicted the outcome of every game in the European Championships that year.

On a blog written after the referendum, Dominic Cummings, Vote Leave’s campaign director, admitted that the competition to win £50m was a data-harvesting exercise. Talking about the necessity of data in targeting voters, he said: “Data flowed in on the ground and was then analysed by the data science team and integrated with all the other data streaming in. This was the point of our £50m prize for predicting the results of the European football championships, which gathered data from people who usually ignore #politics.”

To enter the competition, fans had to input their name, address, email and telephone number, and also how they intended to vote in the referendum. Last year, Martin Moore, director of the centre for the study of media, communication and power at King’s College, London, and the author of an upcoming book, Democracy Hacked, told the Observer that he’d tried to find details of the quiz and exactly what information it had gathered but that the site had been taken down and he could find no trace of it on the internet. “I saw an advert for it at the time. And I couldn’t figure out why it was being done or for what purpose and it was only afterwards that I read Dom Cummings’s blog and I realised that actually it was very clever. Data is very difficult to collect in the UK and they were starting with nothing. But working out what to send what message to what audience was absolutely crucial.

Now it has emerged that a data set referred to by Facebook, called “50million_remains”, is likely to be a competition that Vote Leave ran, in which it offered fans the chance to win £50m if they correctly predicted the outcome of every game in the European Championships that year.

On a blog written after the referendum, Dominic Cummings, Vote Leave’s campaign director, admitted that the competition to win £50m was a data-harvesting exercise. Talking about the necessity of data in targeting voters, he said: “Data flowed in on the ground and was then analysed by the data science team and integrated with all the other data streaming in. This was the point of our £50m prize for predicting the results of the European football championships, which gathered data from people who usually ignore #politics.”

To enter the competition, fans had to input their name, address, email and telephone number, and also how they intended to vote in the referendum. Last year, Martin Moore, director of the centre for the study of media, communication and power at King’s College, London, and the author of an upcoming book, Democracy Hacked, told the Observer that he’d tried to find details of the quiz and exactly what information it had gathered but that the site had been taken down and he could find no trace of it on the internet. “I saw an advert for it at the time. And I couldn’t figure out why it was being done or for what purpose and it was only afterwards that I read Dom Cummings’s blog and I realised that actually it was very clever. Data is very difficult to collect in the UK and they were starting with nothing. But working out what to send what message to what audience was absolutely crucial.