Water accumulator tank – irv2 forums gas utility

#

Paul- I sell the compact Shurflo accumulator which comes factory charged to 20psi (i.e. right out of the box, er, bag, and not hooked up to any plumbing). It has a max rating of 40psi dry. Too much and you will blow the bladder in the accumulator. I see no reason to send it over 30psi dry.

The mounting place in the system should not matter. I recommend a place and orientation where it will be free draining when the piping is drained for winter, otherwise you will find the leak when it ruptures and the ice melts. I have mine mounted up above any plumbing in the basement (mounted to the basement ceiling). House plumbing is above it. The reason location does not matter (assumes open piping, no dead ends closed off by check valves where the pump works without engaging the accumulator) is that the whole of the pressurized plumbing acts like a pressure vessel, same pressure everywhere (ok, within a small amount to account for elevation). If the accumulator is connected to the same pressure regime as the rest of the piping, it all sees the same pressure & same reactions from the pump. The accumulator acts as a sort of long-stroke shock absorber for the pump.

The 5.7’s say they don’t need an accumulator, but real experience shows that many rigs’ plumbing generates a surging effect from the SmartSensor in the 5.7 (mine did). The feedback it is interpreting makes the pump surge for whatever silly reason. Adding the accumulator usually fixes that (mine did).

As to the 20 psi, that’s the pre-charge to keep the bladder full enough of air to work. Once you kick on the pump and it goes to 60 or 65psi, the bladder will get squeezed and the bladder air should read same as the wet side of the plumbing.

If your accumulator is hard to reach to check or correct air pressure, add an extender line, plumbed to a place you can put an air chuck or bicycle pump easily. Simple tubing w/a Schraeder valve on the business end will do it (might have to remove the OEM valve stem @ the accumulator nipple unless you use a spin-on end that depresses it for you to add your extender line).

Paul- I sell the compact Shurflo accumulator which comes factory charged to 20psi (i.e. right out of the box, er, bag, and not hooked up to any plumbing). It has a max rating of 40psi dry. Too much and you will blow the bladder in the accumulator. I see no reason to send it over 30psi dry.

The mounting place in the system should not matter. I recommend a place and orientation where it will be free draining when the piping is drained for winter, otherwise you will find the leak when it ruptures and the ice melts. I have mine mounted up above any plumbing in the basement (mounted to the basement ceiling). House plumbing is above it. The reason location does not matter (assumes open piping, no dead ends closed off by check valves where the pump works without engaging the accumulator) is that the whole of the pressurized plumbing acts like a pressure vessel, same pressure everywhere (ok, within a small amount to account for elevation). If the accumulator is connected to the same pressure regime as the rest of the piping, it all sees the same pressure & same reactions from the pump. The accumulator acts as a sort of long-stroke shock absorber for the pump.

The 5.7’s say they don’t need an accumulator, but real experience shows that many rigs’ plumbing generates a surging effect from the SmartSensor in the 5.7 (mine did). The feedback it is interpreting makes the pump surge for whatever silly reason. Adding the accumulator usually fixes that (mine did).

As to the 20 psi, that’s the pre-charge to keep the bladder full enough of air to work. Once you kick on the pump and it goes to 60 or 65psi, the bladder will get squeezed and the bladder air should read same as the wet side of the plumbing.

If your accumulator is hard to reach to check or correct air pressure, add an extender line, plumbed to a place you can put an air chuck or bicycle pump easily. Simple tubing w/a Schraeder valve on the business end will do it (might have to remove the OEM valve stem @ the accumulator nipple unless you use a spin-on end that depresses it for you to add your extender line).

Hi, I am a full-timer on a well. The water coming into our system comes through a standard water regulator which I purchased at Camping world to keep the pressure down. We have a 40′ KZ Escalade with washer/dryer, shower, bath and kithchen outlets.

We also have an RV500 tankless water heater. The RV500 has issues with the fluctuating water pressure from the well and I am thinking of either taking out my water regulator since the wll pump is somewhere around 40psi. I am also thinking of installing an accumulator which may help stablize the pressure but after reading about them it appears that maybe that’s not such a good idea and is not their intended purpose, especially since a check valve is typically used between the accumulator and the city water connection.