Wec br1 dallara lmp1 – page 17 – tentenths motorsport forum monroe la gas prices

Phillip Island hardly has any paved run-off, and half the lap at Jerez; none of it is to the extent we see with F1. There are a number of other bike circuits I could point to as well. It’s always been F1, not MotoGP, that’s led the charge for paved run-offs.

I’m not talking about "mixing up pedals"; I’m talking about a driver still feeling that he’s at least partway in control and mashing the gas with the intent to lose as little time as possible in getting back to the racing surface/line, and catching a barrier in his overexuberance.

I’m sorry, but it seems like you’re demanding perfection from gravel traps, and any little thing that goes wrong is just proof that every track should be irrevocably turned into a soulless parking lot. But I see no admission of any imperfection with pavement. A reasoned argument generally does mention real drawbacks too.

Paved run-off FAILED to stop Kyle Busch, Denny Hamlin, and that XFinity car that powered all the way into the inside wall on the back straight at Talladega. I’m pretty sure Adrian Fernandez appreciated the gravel outside Turn 4 at Mid Ohio when his throttle stuck open during the CART race in 2001. Again, the paved run-off failed to sufficiently arrest Pietro Fittipaldi. There wouldn’t have been space for Grosjean to go up the inside at La Source without the grasscrete, and he likely wouldn’t have thought he could bail and go wide without the paving outside the turn. Gravel would have reduced te speed of the BR1, quite possibly preventing the liftoff; the very measures meant to mitigate short-cutting may have caused the liftoff, and did cause the F3 flip in 2013. The complacency in no small part caused by the presence of paved run-off at any number of circuits played into the crash that followed when drivers didn’t acknowledge the Safety Car deployment. There was that mess both at Monza and Spa in FIA F3 in 2015, the result of more complacency.

And it’s strange, those turns at Le Mans are part of the permanent, Bugatti Circuit. It’s principally meant for bikes; that change was made in 2002 expressly for the bikes. If gravel was so bad, especially for bikes, it wouldn’t have been left there for 15 years.

Paved run-off FAILED to stop Kyle Busch, Denny Hamlin, and that XFinity car that powered all the way into the inside wall on the back straight at Talladega. I’m pretty sure Adrian Fernandez appreciated the gravel outside Turn 4 at Mid Ohio when his throttle stuck open during the CART race in 2001. Again, the paved run-off failed to sufficiently arrest Pietro Fittipaldi. There wouldn’t have been space for Grosjean to go up the inside at La Source without the grasscrete, and he likely wouldn’t have thought he could bail and go wide without the paving outside the turn. Gravel would have reduced te speed of the BR1, quite possibly preventing the liftoff; the very measures meant to mitigate short-cutting may have caused the liftoff, and did cause the F3 flip in 2013. The complacency in no small part caused by the presence of paved run-off at any number of circuits played into the crash that followed when drivers didn’t acknowledge the Safety Car deployment. There was that mess both at Monza and Spa in FIA F3 in 2015, the result of more complacency.

Out of all those incidents, the only one that bears any weight is Adrian Fernandez‘s stuck throttle. And I hate to break it to you, but it STILL doesn’t prove anything for one simple reason: Brakes, by design, overpower the throttle of a car. If the runoff had been paved it is entirely possible he would have slowed to a near stop before reaching the wall. In fact, I can be reasonably sure he would have hit the wall with less force had the runoff been paved because just like McNish in the clip I linked, his car SKIPPED across the gravel trap – it only just started to catch the gravel right before impact with the wall. Worst case scenario, the incident would have been almost identical.

None of the other incidents you cite were affected by the paved runoff in any negative way. A couple may have been caused by the painting used on said runoff, but that is NOT the same as being caused by the paved runoff in and of itself. The fact that the paved runoffs didn’t prevent a car from hitting the wall doesn’t mean they didn’t have an immensely beneficial impact by slowing the cars considerably before the impact occurred. (and frankly at those speeds NOTHING is going to prevent a car from reaching the wall with any sort of consistency)