What were they expecting (indie game sales numbers) thread – indie db electricity test physics

###########

To explain what I mean, let’s look at The New York Times best seller list. Without looking it up, I want you to take a guess how many books you would have to sell to make it onto the list. Got a number in mind? Ok. gas 69 The answer? From what I read online, the number varies between 5-8 …thousand. At this point, some people get incredulous. Harry Potty or Game of Thrones sells more than that, and you’d be right. But once you move outside of household names like 50 Shades of Grey or The Martian, the numbers fall off dramatically. How many of you have read "The Nightingale" by Kristin Hannah, which is on the list at time of writing? Hell, who’s even heard of it? I don’t mean to knock the book, I’m sure it’s great, and I don’t have the raw sales numbers, but that’s what I read about best sellers.

Maybe you want game specific examples. Ok. I occationally play what some would call "weeb games", Senran Kagura, Gal Gun, stuff like that. Again, I don’t have the hard numbers, but it’s not unusual to hear of these games having print runs as small as 50,000 to 10,000. electricity magnetism This idea is backed up by Steam sale numbers for the PC ports selling around that many. Speaking of which, the Dark Souls esc game The Surge has 70,000 sales on Steam. Remember, these are games made by professional teams with publisher backing. The idea that 2 guys in their bedrooms can make a game that will surpass those in terms of sales is …optimistic at best.

Which brings me to one last point. Where are they spending the money? Let’s say a game costs 20 USD on Steam. It sells 10,000 copies, that’s 200,000. Steam takes a 30% cut, but lets say you’ve got taxes and other stuff to pay, and say that you only get 50% of that money. That’s still $100,000. gas news australia I rarely see what it is indie games are spending the money on, because they are rarely graphically or technically impressive.

So, what am I missing? What do these indie game devs really expect sales wise, and why? The closest I can think of is that they are all expecting to be the next Five Nights at Freddy’s, or Undertale, but even that seems foolish given how few games get that popular. Again, even mid level publishers with all their resources don’t expect that.

…Which brings me to one last point. Where are they spending the money? Let’s say a game costs 20 USD on Steam. It sells 10,000 copies, that’s 200,000. Steam takes a 30% cut, but lets say you’ve got taxes and other stuff to pay, and say that you only get 50% of that money. That’s still $100,000. I rarely see what it is indie games are spending the money on, because they are rarely graphically or technically impressive.

So, what am I missing? What do these indie game devs really expect sales wise, and why? The closest I can think of is that they are all expecting to be the next Five Nights at Freddy’s, or Undertale, but even that seems foolish given how few games get that popular. Again, even mid level publishers with all their resources don’t expect that.

I live in a relatively cheap area in midwest America. To be an indie developer, I have bills to pay. gas in babies at night Namely: internet, rent, vehicle insurance + health insurance, electricity, food, etc. On top of that you will have fees that your team will require: Cloud storage, domain names, websites, replacement hardware, additional hardware for development (Mic, drawing tablet, decent camera…), paying other devs, etc.

If I wanted to justify pursuing game development, I would need a minimum ~$33,000 in revenue (After taxes, royalties, etc) to cover expenses and make up for potential lost if I didn’t pursue something else. gas emoji That’s an absolute minimum and not including major unforeseen expenses, I would actually have lost money, I wouldn’t save any money to start development of my next game, and my personal health would hate me for living on the bare minimum lifestyle.

Getting into the messy details, like sales, bundles, unexpected debts, what have you, I was trying to keep things simple for the sake of explanation, but it’s a legitimate criticism of what I said. However, it’s a criticism that cuts both ways. Obviously, you can’t plan for the unexpected, but you can try and save some money in case things don’t go according to plan. It would seem that these devs haven’t done that.

The problem is you already established you’re operating at a loss. $18.000 a year according to you. You have to keep costs to an absolute minimum. Why are you hiring people? Why do you need payed cloud storage? Why do you need a camera? Why not get affordable, consumer level tech before you quit your day job? I can understand, say, commissioning a soundtrack, but that should only be for stuff you absolutely can’t do yourself. (eg. I have no musical talent and no music production tools.) Again, just to be clear, I’m no expert on the matter. My work is dumb hobby stuff that is nowhere near release worthy. However, I’m trying to learn to do 3D myself because I simply can’t afford to pay people to make 3D assets for me. At least I have a better idea of where they are spending the money.

I don’t know. I’m not the right person to ask. One place to start would be to go on steamspy (or any other service where you can see sales data) and look up other, similar games. la gasolina cancion Also, look up the developers and see if they have any previous work, and if they had a publisher. Also, look up the devs (and publsishers) to see if they have a history. Finally, even once you have sales numbers of those games, don’t expect to get that high. But as said, I’m not the right person to ask.

Conversely you have or had modders for Half-Life 1 for example, that had few people, but were not only making some of the best mods out there for HL1 or any moddable game, but even surpassing some store shelf games and all these mods when they came out were completely free and most still are. Sure they used the HL game engine and tools like Hammer and what not. Maybe they had permission to use basic assets from one game to another. Perhaps most were FPSs that were just simply easier to make because HL1 was obviously a FPS game. gas and bloating after miscarriage Possibly people just liked to make maps and new textures and shared them with the community.

But online games like Natural Selection, Counter Strike, Day of Defeat, Sven Co-op, Hostile Intent, The Battlegrounds, Brain Bread, etc. could basically not be found any where else. Now you have triple A titles that use those same formulas. Heck it is my firm opinion that Left 4 Dead had borrowed ideas from Brain Bread. If these talented modders who were not getting paid a single cent, (Although I am sure there were donations generously given.) was before any crowd funding program that I am aware of, could both do what they did and still live a reasonable life, why can not indie game makers?